Author Topic: Problems Me or T4?  (Read 1568 times)

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Offline Denn

Problems Me or T4?
« on: March 28, 2024, 02:21:17 AM »
Problems Me or T4?
1. Turn on Tyros4
2 Select a registration
3 Select a style.
4. Press Mixing Console
5 Sliders on Panel Part all to zero
6 Press Mixing Console to get to Style
7. All Parts to zero
8 Next style part and All Parts to zero
9. The style slider must me up or you get no sound, I put it to 100
Now with all the voices turned OFF on the panel and style I still get a scratchy string sound and a sax type voice playing when I play notes on the left. It does not matter what the style is, the sound is the same
I donít want that, I want clean sounding voices in the left chords.
Please help.
Regards, Denn.
Love knitting dolls
 

Offline overover

Re: Problems Me or T4?
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2024, 04:05:31 AM »
Hi Denn,

You're obviously talking about the "STOP ACMP" function here. When the ACMP button is turned on and the style is stopped, the chords played in the chord detection area are played back with a pad/string sound, and a bass sound also can be heard.

Please go to "[FUNCTION] > STYLE SETTING/SPLIT POINT/CHORD FINGERING > STYLE SETTING" and set the "STOP ACMP" parameter to "OFF". Then press EXIT to close the setting display. This will automatically save the changes to the System Setup.

By the way, if "FIXED" is set here, you will hear the same bass and pad/string sound for all styles, but if "STYLE" is set, the sounds of the bass part and pad part of the current STYLE are used.

Note that this setting is always memorized in Registrations when STYLE is ticked in the Memory dialog. So this setting can be changed again by calling up Registrations that contain a different STOP ACMP setting.


Hope this helps!

Best regards,
Chris
« Last Edit: March 28, 2024, 04:15:27 AM by overover »
➪ Everyone kept saying "That won't work!" - Then someone came along who didn't know that and just did it.
➪ Never put the manual too far away: There's more in it than you think! ;-)
 
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Offline Denn

Re: Problems Me or T4?
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2024, 06:27:48 AM »
Hello Chris, Have just had a little play with this. Have just got the latest and greatest hearing aids ($9800  ::) ) and my Tyros and the SX700 sound awful! Will have to go through and make some adjustments. I could not hear those strings in the style when all the voices were turned off before. Now they are a pain as that is not what I want.
I also posted on here how to get the Lowry organ sound. Well I found that if you set a sax,  Ballad Tenor sax for example and turn the filters right down then you get a smooth sound without all the hissing and spitting. Suits me fine.  ;D
Thanks for your help.
Regards, Denn.
Love knitting dolls
 

Offline overover

Re: Problems Me or T4?
« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2024, 11:47:20 PM »
You're welcome, Denn! Thanks for your feedback. :)


Best regards,
Chris
➪ Everyone kept saying "That won't work!" - Then someone came along who didn't know that and just did it.
➪ Never put the manual too far away: There's more in it than you think! ;-)
 

Offline travlin-easy

Re: Problems Me or T4?
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2024, 06:05:28 PM »
Keep in mind that hearing aids, even the latest and greatest, are not suitable for arranger keyboard playing. Hearing aids are nothing more than an amplifier with a built in mic and speaker, both of which are very, very tiny. They are meant to improve your ability to hear sounds/frequencies that  you are missing, during normal conversation - not musical instruments, electronic or acoustic.

When the hearing aid specialist adjusts your hearing aids, he or she is setting them by amplifying the frequencies that you have lost from various reasons, infections, trauma, etc... Therefore, some sounds coming from your keyboard will sound tinny or harsh. Now, that frequency is amplified by digitally selecting that frequency, and cranking up the volume. However, that tiny device that fits in your ear, which in most instances is a small balloon device fed by a tiny, clear tube, is blocking off the sounds you would normally hear, mainly bass and intermediate frequencies. If you have a hearing aid in both ears, you are missing a lot of wonderful sounds.

The solution is to wear a hearing aid in just one ear, the ear that you are having the most problems. They can determine which ear it is at the hearing aid center, but they want to make a huge amount of money by selling you two, claiming all sorts of stupid things such as loss of balance, etc..., none of which have any medical documentation to back these claims up with.

How do I know this? I purchased a pair of Bose hearing aids, which were relatively inexpensive in comparison to the highly advertised brands on TV. When I played with both aids in my ears, the highs and mid range sounds were just awful. However, when I removed one and only played with one in my right ear, which was the most damaged, everything sounds great. I was a first loaded of a 3-inch 50mm antiaircraft gun while in the US Navy. I stood back to back with another first loader, directly between the breech of both guns - no hearing protection and the blast was horrendous. When the guns fired, I was looking at the back of the gun, where the loading tray was situated and pulling out another round to be placed in the hopper. BOOM! You were instantly deaf for several hours. They didn't care back then, you wee 17 years old and expendable, and so was your hearing.

As we age naturally, men tend to lose their high frequency hearing ability, while on the other hand, women tend to lost their low frequency sounds. Now, maybe nature intended this to be. I cannot hear her when she is telling me what I did wrong for the past 61 years, and she cannot hear my replies. ;)

Good luck,

Gary 8)
Love Those Yammies...
 
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Offline Amwilburn

Re: Problems Me or T4?
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2024, 08:10:16 PM »
As we age naturally, men tend to lose their high frequency hearing ability, while on the other hand, women tend to lost their low frequency sounds. Now, maybe nature intended this to be. I cannot hear her when she is telling me what I did wrong for the past 61 years, and she cannot hear my replies. ;)

Good luck,

Gary 8)

 ;D ;D 😂😂😂

Offline Denn

Re: Problems Me or T4?
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2024, 02:29:23 AM »
Hello Gary, You have made my day! All my voices on the SX700 and the T4 sounded squeaky and harsh. I went into the mixer and set the filters to -64 and then I had a great sound. When I play without the hearing aids in, the sounds are great but with the aids in everything sounds strange. OK for watching TV which I do about once a week. I noticed the awful sounds when I played one of my CD's I had recorded in 2009 on my PSR S900. Played this on my computer and it was not nice. Took off the aids and it sounded "good?"  Thanks for your info
Kind regards, Denn.
Love knitting dolls
 
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Offline rattley

Re: Problems Me or T4?
« Reply #7 on: April 21, 2024, 06:51:13 AM »
Hello,

Your discussion on hearing aids made me wonder as I don't know much about them. Do they amplify or try to amplify only specific frequencies, as in speech, or do they try to amplify 20-20000hz?  Are there hearing aids especially for musicians?  How does one do a final mix after recording if you know you are frequency challenged?  -charley
 
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Offline travlin-easy

Re: Problems Me or T4?
« Reply #8 on: April 21, 2024, 09:29:51 PM »
Charley, hearing aids primarily amplify specific frequencies, mainly those the range of a normal voice that have been lost due to aging and injuries. Some companies advertise their aids as digital, however, anyone that has ever worked with sound systems knows you cannot hear digital sounds, only analog sounds.

Hearing aid specialist usually hone in on sounds that you have lost over the years, which is determined by using an analog tone generator, and having the patient respond to changes in frequency. "Can you hear this? If you can, raise your index finger." It is a standard test that has not really changed in decades.

Of course, the very next step is to sell you 2 hearing aids, one for each ear, claiming this will be even better for your hearing ability. However, as explained earlier, that second aid blocks your ability to be able to hear sounds outside those that are selectively amplified by the hearing aid. Usually, those mid and low range sounds are not amplified, particularly for men. However, they are for women, mainly because they are the sounds lost by women as they age.

As a musician/singer/entertainer, I only wore a single hearing aid, which solved the problem of blocking those mid and lower range sounds. While watching TV, though, I wore both aids, which made it easier for me to understand what the ladies on Fox News were saying during a newscast. Same held true for watching movies on TV.

Hope this helps,

Gary 8) The old codger.
Love Those Yammies...
 
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