Author Topic: Next Yamaha Arranger Keyboards  (Read 7974 times)

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Offline pjd

Re: Next Yamaha Arranger Keyboards
« Reply #50 on: March 15, 2024, 11:06:22 PM »
Weirdly, some form of Articulation Element Modeling (also known as Super Articulation 2) was included in the NSX-1, the chip embedded in the NSX-39 Pocket MIKU. Technically, there is some conceptual (mathematical, algorithmic) connection to Vocaloid.

The SA2 Female Vocals expansion pack played with this idea in the opposite direction -- bringing Vocaloid-like synthesis to SA2. Like many technologies, Yamaha experimented, tried it out and then abandoned.

Technically, SA2 synthesis is very much possible in the existing hardware. The trick is convincing Yamaha marketing otherwise. Plus, there are front panel controls, further software integration costs to consider.

I agree with Mark. I don't think Yamaha will give up on this top-of-the-line differentiator.

Always willing to be shocked and surprised -- pj
« Last Edit: March 15, 2024, 11:08:03 PM by pjd »
 

Offline luiscarlos2000

Re: Next Yamaha Arranger Keyboards
« Reply #51 on: March 23, 2024, 10:47:07 PM »
Hi mark,
Unless I could buy THE PSR-A5000, Maybe I will wait untill the next PSR-A keyboard comes out. I was searching for that keyboard in Amazon in my region (Americas/Panama) but they say it's still out of stock. I've posted on that wishlist topic about that fUTure PSR-A model (even made an ideascale) about complete accessibility for blind players/people. And also I need a new keyboard since my current PSR-A3000 is getting some damage, E.G. Some buttons don't work.
The suggestions are amazing to say the least.
Past Yamaha keyboards that I now don't use: PSR-S710, PSR-A2000
Current Yamaha keyboard I use: PSR-A3000
Next, or future, Yamaha keyboard I will use: PSR-A5000
 

Offline andyg

Re: Next Yamaha Arranger Keyboards
« Reply #52 on: March 23, 2024, 11:08:41 PM »
There are valid commercial reasons why the smaller (even up to the SX) keyboards have adaptors.

If you make something mains powered it has be certified for each of the countries/regions it's exported to. (That's one reason we don't have Stagea and D-Deck in Europe) It means a separate production line for each country/region to cope with various voltages and mains frequencies and any other region-specific requirements (that's the second, and main, reason). If you make a keyboard run on 12 or 16 volts via an adaptor, you can export that product worldwide with no regional changes. Only the adaptor is different for the various countries/regions and only that adaptor needs to be certified.

There's enough margin on the Genos to cover the costs involved.

As for SA2 voices, it would be nice, but I think that they'll want to keep that Genos-only, to make a clear differentiation between the two lines, same as they do with CVP and arranger keyboards.
It's not what you play, it's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

www.andrew-gilbert.com
 

Offline Amwilburn

Re: Next Yamaha Arranger Keyboards
« Reply #53 on: March 24, 2024, 01:19:20 AM »
Hi mark,
Unless I could buy THE PSR-A5000, Maybe I will wait untill the next PSR-A keyboard comes out. I was searching for that keyboard in Amazon in my region (Americas/Panama) but they say it's still out of stock. I've posted on that wishlist topic about that fUTure PSR-A model (even made an ideascale) about complete accessibility for blind players/people. And also I need a new keyboard since my current PSR-A3000 is getting some damage, E.G. Some buttons don't work.
The suggestions are amazing to say the least.

I guess it depends where you are; we received stock in 2021 when it first launched, and we did sell out. But after that first year, we've had no trouble getting stock. But I'm in Canada, and we have a very large contingent of arranger players from the Middle East, which is the target market for the A5000

Mark

Offline luiscarlos2000

Re: Next Yamaha Arranger Keyboards
« Reply #54 on: March 25, 2024, 03:50:48 AM »
Great that now they have stock in there! I went to the US 3 or so months ago to a music store. Well, 2 in total, as I went to the store that Yamaha provides me for dealers during thanksgiving and obviously it was closed! Went to the second and I did test a standard equivalent of the A5000, the PSR-SX 700 I believe. It sounded amazing. I was browsing the layout of the keyboard and I liked it. Maybe
1: Or I contact Yamaha USA directly if there could be any delivery from USA to Panama or
2: Wait untill we organize another travel to the US to the same previous dealer that was closed to see. I also noticed that not only the PSR-A5000 wasn't there on the second store, but also the Genos 2. Maybe super, super early at that time?
Past Yamaha keyboards that I now don't use: PSR-S710, PSR-A2000
Current Yamaha keyboard I use: PSR-A3000
Next, or future, Yamaha keyboard I will use: PSR-A5000
 

Offline Denn

Re: Next Yamaha Arranger Keyboards
« Reply #55 on: April 01, 2024, 05:00:52 AM »
Always on the want, never satisfied. I can remember these postings from way back when PSR S900 and Tyros 1 hit the market. I have written:-
If you can ride a bike then you could play a piano. If you can master a Tyros4 you could fly a jumbo jet.

Kind regards, Denn.
Love knitting dolls
 

Offline mikf

Re: Next Yamaha Arranger Keyboards
« Reply #56 on: April 01, 2024, 02:34:09 PM »
I learned to ride a bike at 7 years old, in about 1 hour and a couple of grazed knees, and bruised elbows. Learning to play piano took many, many years. About 99% of the population can ride a bike, what %  would you listen to playing piano.
Mike
 

Offline Amwilburn

Re: Next Yamaha Arranger Keyboards
« Reply #57 on: May 10, 2024, 08:59:01 PM »
Maybe 5 or 6% can *actually* play. Most stats put piano owners as 10-12% of the population, but that's including a *lot* of students, a lot of whom you wouldn't want to listen to playing.