Author Topic: 24 bit vs 32 bit  (Read 834 times)

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24 bit vs 32 bit
« on: October 22, 2022, 02:56:21 AM »
I see that Yamaha used 32 bit dac in the genos and 24 bit dac in the sx and all other arrangers Iím just curious whatís the difference between the two
« Last Edit: October 22, 2022, 04:12:20 AM by Keyboard Master »
 

Offline Bill

Re: 24 bit vs 32 bit
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2022, 09:05:23 AM »
Think of it as the resolution (quality) of the digital conversion. A bit like the pixel resolution of a TV or PC Monitor.

Bill

England

Current KB:  YAMAHA GENOS OS Ver. 2.11
 

Offline BogdanH

Re: 24 bit vs 32 bit
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2022, 10:12:25 AM »
Bill made a good comparison. Now the question is, what a difference 24bit vs 32bit DAC (Digital to Analog Converter) makes in real life?
If only for listening: none -no matter if listening to onboard speakers, over headphones or via external PA speakers.

The thing is, 24bit is already above human's ability to distinguish between two adjacent levels. So why 32bit then? It's only meant for professional studios, where a lot fine post-processing of audio signal is done. During this process a higher precision is needed, so the end result is still good enough (16bit in case of CD).
It's similar to tape recordings in old days, where studios recorded at very high (tape) speeds. And after mixing (adding effects, etc.) they ended with hi-quality master result -so we could get "decent" sound on cassette. For tapes, noise was the enemy (which reduced dynamic range) and high tape speeds reduced noise tremendously. In digital world however, accumulated arithmetic error is the enemy, and so higher starting precision is used.

Bogdan
PSR-SX700 on K&M-18820 stand
Playing for myself on Youtube
 
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Re: 24 bit vs 32 bit
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2022, 07:21:55 PM »
Bill made a good comparison. Now the question is, what a difference 24bit vs 32bit DAC (Digital to Analog Converter) makes in real life?
If only for listening: none -no matter if listening to onboard speakers, over headphones or via external PA speakers.

The thing is, 24bit is already above human's ability to distinguish between two adjacent levels. So why 32bit then? It's only meant for professional studios, where a lot fine post-processing of audio signal is done. During this process a higher precision is needed, so the end result is still good enough (16bit in case of CD).
It's similar to tape recordings in old days, where studios recorded at very high (tape) speeds. And after mixing (adding effects, etc.) they ended with hi-quality master result -so we could get "decent" sound on cassette. For tapes, noise was the enemy (which reduced dynamic range) and high tape speeds reduced noise tremendously. In digital world however, accumulated arithmetic error is the enemy, and so higher starting precision is used.

Bogdan
That is good to know. THanks 8)