Author Topic: Let's speak VCM  (Read 1536 times)

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Offline Luluc

Let's speak VCM
« on: July 23, 2021, 01:55:35 PM »
Hi all,

What is the meaning of the acronym VCM we found in the naming of some effects : VCM Compressor, VCM Flanger1, VCM Phaser1, ...

Many thanks,
Luluc
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Yamaha Genos - Focusrite Scarlett 8i6 - Behringer FCB1010 - AKG K92
 

Offline ugawoga

Re: Let's speak VCM
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2021, 02:30:13 PM »
Voice Component Modeling :)
The same as with Synths
« Last Edit: July 23, 2021, 02:32:10 PM by ugawoga »
Genos, I7 computer 32 gig ram, Focusrite 6i6, Cubase controller, Focal Alpha Monitors, Yamaha DXR8 Speakers
Cubase 10, Sonarworks, Izotope.  Sampletank, Arturia and Korg software.  Now IK Mixbox
 

Offline overover

Re: Let's speak VCM
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2021, 02:38:17 PM »
Voice Component Modeling :)
The same as with Synths

Not quite correct. ;)

VCM is the acronym for "Virtual Circuit Modeling" which means virtual (digital) modeling of analogue circuits (e.g. amps or effect devices).


Best regards,
Chris
Everyone always said: "This is not possible!" - Then someone came and ... just did it!
 
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Offline Luluc

Re: Let's speak VCM
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2021, 03:27:49 PM »
Thx all for you inputs.
Luluc
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Yamaha Genos - Focusrite Scarlett 8i6 - Behringer FCB1010 - AKG K92
 

Offline ugawoga

Re: Let's speak VCM
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2021, 10:58:47 AM »
Not quite correct. ;)

VCM is the acronym for "Virtual Circuit Modeling" which means virtual (digital) modeling of analogue circuits (e.g. amps or effect devices).


Best regards,
Chris

Well chris , nearly then :)
Genos, I7 computer 32 gig ram, Focusrite 6i6, Cubase controller, Focal Alpha Monitors, Yamaha DXR8 Speakers
Cubase 10, Sonarworks, Izotope.  Sampletank, Arturia and Korg software.  Now IK Mixbox
 

Offline pjd

Re: Let's speak VCM
« Reply #5 on: July 27, 2021, 11:43:10 PM »
Hi --

I found the info below in a Yamaha brochure.

Have fun -- pj

"Modeling is a means to an end, not the final goal." Mr. Toshifumi Kunimoto, the central figure of Yamaha’s physical modeling technology team, has a fine track record when it comes to meeting some very challenging goals. The division known at Yamaha as "K’s Lab" ("K" for "Kunimoto") was established in 1987 to develop new modeling technology that would become the next phase in synthesizer evolution after the FM and PCM tone generators that were the mainstay of the synthesizer world at the time.  The result was the world’s first physical modeling synthesizers -- the VL1 and VP1 -- released in 1993. Research and development has continued relentlessly ever since, and in 2001 the K’s Lab team began aiming it’s formidable technological capabilities at physical modeling for effects, and that’s when Mr. Kunimoto’s goal began to take on primary importance. The goal? In a word, "musicality."

The K’s Lab team were aware that the earliest effect modeling technologies were focused more on superficial reproduction of specific characteristics and tonalities than on actually making music, and it was clear that by applying the same physical modeling technology that was used in the original VL1 and VP1 synthesizers, although in a significantly more evolved form, it would be possible to deliver truly accurate, eminently musical effects. And rather than relying on frequency response graphs and other "precision" measurements to evaluate final performance, many critical performance decisions were made using the trained ears of top-level music and sound specialists.

It took more than two years of concentrated work, but by 2003 K’s Lab had refined and repurposed physical modeling to the point where it was ready for practical implementation -- in the form of Virtual Circuit Modeling. VCM is the cornerstone of Yamaha’s Add-On Effects, and achieves it’s stunning sonic and musical performance by actually modeling the individual characteristics of the multitude of parts and components that contributed to the final sound of the original analog circuits: transistors, tape, tape heads, etc. Even subtle saturation effects have been painstakingly modeled to bring the warmth and richness of the original analog gear back to life in stable, easy-to-operate digital form.
 
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