Author Topic: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.  (Read 7240 times)

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Offline Piano Tone

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #50 on: November 10, 2021, 07:27:50 PM »
As for menu-diving on the E400 series, as compared to the Korg EK50, though I have no hands-on experience with the Korg, when I look at the pictures of its control panel, I really don't see what this is about.  Yes, I can see direct push-buttons to turn on and off the three right-hand parts and the split/left hand part, as well as the style parts, but I do not see any direct controls to change the volume or octave of these parts.  Direct buttons for overall octave and transposition are there, which is good.  But other than that, I don't see a major difference in regard to the Yamaha E400 series.  At least the E433 on up has direct buttons to turn on and off the dual and split voices, and there are direct buttons to turn on and off parts of an auto-accompaniment style.  And remember, for deeper editing of the sounds, all you have to do is hit and hold down a particular button for certain features, and then the keyboard automatically jumps to the correct part of the menu list of functions, reducing the need to scroll through dozens of parameters to find what you want.  Like if you want to change the dual voice octave, you just hit and hold down the dual voice button for a couple seconds, and then it is just a couple button presses from there to get to the dual voice octave function.  Admittedly, they don't have this explicitly available for the main voice, but you can either hold down dual voice button, then just step backwards through the functions to go into the main voice parameters, or use one of the other functions (it might be style volume, but I'm not sure), that is only a couple clicks away from the main voice parameters.

Hi there!  The EK-50 user interface is amazing.  To change a relative voice volume layer, hold the button for the layer, spin the knob, the display will show your volume going up and down.  Same for a relative accompaniment part volume; hold the button spin the knob.  Same for a backing track relative volume; hold button, spin knob.  Same for BPM of metronome or rhythm; hold shift button, spin knob.   To octave shift a voice layer, hold the layer and hit the octave shift button. 

No menu deep diving at all, it's a brilliantly thought out interface.  As a matter of fact if you do go into the equivalent of the PSR series (massive) "function" menu, there are only a handful of entries, none of which are things you need often (specifying battery type etc).

Go to 9:09 in my review if you want to go straight to the user interface section.  https://youtu.be/X59R-PWCoDg 
« Last Edit: November 10, 2021, 07:39:10 PM by Piano Tone »
 

Offline SciNote

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #51 on: November 10, 2021, 08:47:44 PM »
I agree that this sounds convenient, but still not truly direct, as holding down a button and then spinning the knob at the same time still requires you to use both hands at the same time.  And like I said, it's really not all that different than many of the PSR-E400-series functions, where you hold down a particular button to get to the function parameters related to that button, such as dual voice or split voice, then only have to tap the function-select button one or two times to get to the commonly used level and octave settings, then simply turn the knob (or use the plus and minus keys) to adjust the parameter.  Certainly, it's still not something you'd generally do during live playing, but it's not like you have to start from the beginning of a long list of functions and step through dozens of functions to get to what you want.

The EK-50 seems to be equivalent to the older PSR-530 to PSR-740 type keyboards, in that there are hundreds of (presumably) high quality sounds, and many effects that can be applied, but with no synthesizer type editing, such as filter or envelope generator.  I am curious, does the EK-50 have portamento, either as a selectable function or built in to some synthesizer sounds?
Bob
Current: Yamaha PSR-E433, Roland GAIA SH-01, Casio CDP-200R, Casio MT-68 (wired to bass pedals)
Past: Yamaha PSR-520, PSR-510, PSR-500, DX-7, D-80 home organ, and a few Casios
 

Offline casiokid

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #52 on: November 11, 2021, 10:01:52 AM »
I had an EK-50. Voices and adjustments were great. Lovely keybed. Choosing voices 'on the fly' meant using both hands. Downside was the loading of additional styles which have to be loaded in sets of six (Korg Set Lists). The on board Effects, apart from Reverb' I found were not much use and there was no 'panning.'
« Last Edit: November 11, 2021, 10:10:44 AM by casiokid »
 

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #53 on: November 25, 2021, 12:45:02 AM »
Agreed! i also Believe that the psr E473/ew425 could launch any day now even during the holidays. We might get Surprised.
 

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #54 on: December 26, 2021, 07:37:58 AM »
Hello again everyone merry Christmas 🎄. Still don’t see the psr e473 launched yet. Has anyone heard anything yet. I’m just curious.
 

Offline pjd

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #55 on: December 27, 2021, 05:34:03 PM »
Everything in musical instrument retail is on a slow schedule. The Winter NAMM show was postponed to June 3-5 in Anaheim, California, replacing the Summer NAMM usually held in Nashville.

A quick look at on-line retailers (mostly USA) shows Yamaha out-of-stock no matter what the category: digital pianos, arrangers or synths. Guitar Center locally (Seattle) claimed that arrangers, in particular, are hard to obtain. Even if Yamaha announced it, units wouldn't be available for months.

Having missed the holiday season, there's not much incentive for a new entry-level product.

-- pj
 

Offline pjd

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #56 on: January 12, 2022, 06:05:36 PM »
Well, Yamaha's competition is coming. Casio have been running a teaser for a new entry-level board of some sort. Four octaves and may have a vocoder. Uses the AiX LSI developed for the CT-Xx000 keyboards which compete with the Yamaha E-series.

A member of the Musicplayer Keyboard forum posted the pre-release image below.

Announcment date is simply January 2022.

All the best -- pj

Offline SciNote

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #57 on: January 12, 2022, 11:01:09 PM »
Looks interesting, especially with those extra knobs.  But doesn't look too extensive -- certainly doesn't appear to have the capabilities of the Yamaha PSR-E400-series, but I know looks can sometimes be deceiving.  However, I'd really have to think about purchasing anything with just 4 octaves for how I would use such a keyboard.  I normally split the keyboard on my E433 and play both hands on that keyboard at once -- 4 octaves would really limit the range for that -- assuming that it can even split the keyboard, at all.  The vocoder is interesting, but not likely anything that I would use much, if at all.

Might make for a nice extra keyboard -- kind of like how I use my Roland Gaia synth with 3 octaves -- but might be kind of limited for a main keyboard.  But, we'll see!
Bob
Current: Yamaha PSR-E433, Roland GAIA SH-01, Casio CDP-200R, Casio MT-68 (wired to bass pedals)
Past: Yamaha PSR-520, PSR-510, PSR-500, DX-7, D-80 home organ, and a few Casios
 

Offline SciNote

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #58 on: January 14, 2022, 05:37:53 AM »
Did some digging and found this...

https://www.synthanatomy.com/2022/01/casio-ct-1000v-new-keyboard-with-vocal-synthesis-is-coming-soon.html

It looks like the "vocal" part isn't a vocoder, but instead some sort of vocal synthesis.  I'm guessing maybe a focus on various human voice and choir sounds.  Notice the big portamento knob!  The videos on the page are just teasers, but if they are indicative of the sound the keyboard can make, it might be interesting.  That webpage says it's supposed to be out sometime this month, but we all know about chip shortages and product delays these days.
Bob
Current: Yamaha PSR-E433, Roland GAIA SH-01, Casio CDP-200R, Casio MT-68 (wired to bass pedals)
Past: Yamaha PSR-520, PSR-510, PSR-500, DX-7, D-80 home organ, and a few Casios
 

Offline pjd

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #59 on: January 14, 2022, 06:19:58 PM »
Hi Bob --

Thanks. I agree that the CT-S1000V does not compete directly with the E-series. I wonder if this is Casio's answer to the VKB-100 Vocaloid keyboard?

https://sandsoftwaresound.net/yamaha-vkb-100-redux/

Casio appears to be running around playing Internet whack-a-mole with the images. Why are these people so controlling? It just hacks off influencers who might put a positive spin on their products.

All the best to ya -- pj

Offline vbdx66

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #60 on: January 14, 2022, 09:39:34 PM »
Hi Guys,

This is really interesting stuff.

First of all, this states “new keyboards”, plural. So what’s the main difference between the two models? The second one is only partly visible, maybe it has 5 octaves, 61 keys.

Secondly, the two control knobs have two labels, K1/Vocal type and K2/Portamento. Hopefully these knobs can be assigned to various parameters - this is where the real fun might begin.

Any wild guesses as to what K1 and K2 stand for? “Kontrol” in German maybe? Or simply “Knob”?

If there’s a five octaves model with two assignable control knobs, I’m in, esp. if our long-awaited PSR-E473 is still delayed.

In passing : Gearfacts on his YouTube channel in an answer to a comment I wrote made an allusion to something interesting due to come very soon from Yamaha. It might well be the PSR E473 after all, who knows…

Further, the UI of these new Casiotones strongly reminds that of the CT-S400. Behind its simplicity, the CT-S400 is a very capable entry-level keyboard with an interesting onboard MIDI recorder which has the possibility to control the volume and the panning of all three voices, as well as copy/paste function of individual tracks between different recordings. Very handy in an entry-level keyboard. On the CT-S400 the five buttons under the LCD screen have various functions depending on the mode you’re in (tone, rhythm etc.). Presumably it’ll be the same for these new Casiotones so let’s not be fooled by the apparent simplicity of the UI, it might hide some powerful features.

Isn’t life beautiful?

Regards,

Vinciane
Past keyboards: PSR E313, PSR E413, PSR E433, PSR S550, DGX 640, upright piano.
Now: DGX 650, Casio CT-X800.
 

Offline vbdx66

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #61 on: January 14, 2022, 10:13:13 PM »
Hi Guys,

If you watch closely this tease video and you count the white keys, this keyboard definitely has 5 octaves or am I mistaken?  8)

https://youtu.be/qUDilQUOyuc

Regards,

Vinciane
Past keyboards: PSR E313, PSR E413, PSR E433, PSR S550, DGX 640, upright piano.
Now: DGX 650, Casio CT-X800.
 

Offline vbdx66

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #62 on: January 14, 2022, 10:39:47 PM »
Yet another leaked photo on Reddit. The back of one of these new Casiotones can be seen.

@SciNote @PJD can you maybe guess what connectivity the keyboard has? Thanks.

Vinciane
Past keyboards: PSR E313, PSR E413, PSR E433, PSR S550, DGX 640, upright piano.
Now: DGX 650, Casio CT-X800.
 

Offline vbdx66

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #63 on: January 14, 2022, 10:56:37 PM »
Another update yet:

On the Casio Music Forums, Mike Martin just confirmed to me that the K1/K2 knobs are assignable and that one of the two new keyboards indeed had 61 keys  :D

Cheers.

Vinciane
Past keyboards: PSR E313, PSR E413, PSR E433, PSR S550, DGX 640, upright piano.
Now: DGX 650, Casio CT-X800.
 

Offline vbdx66

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #64 on: January 14, 2022, 11:02:19 PM »
Yet another teaser video. On this one you can clearly hear the speech synthesis as well as some sounds and rhythms of one of the Casiotones:

https://youtu.be/5x7UoP-3Ko4

Vinciane
Past keyboards: PSR E313, PSR E413, PSR E433, PSR S550, DGX 640, upright piano.
Now: DGX 650, Casio CT-X800.
 

Offline pjd

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #65 on: January 14, 2022, 11:46:52 PM »
Hello Vinciane --

Thanks for all of the links, pictures and info. I already updated my site.  :)

"K" probably means "knob." Can't imagine mixing German and English on a front panel. Or overusing "K" -- unless you're Korg. :-)

As to connectivity, the only identifiable port is a USB-A port, probably for a USB jump drive. The rest? We'll know in a few days.

Mike Martin strikes me as a decent chap. He has a lot of respect on the Musicplayer Keyboard forum.

I'll have to scan a CT-S400 manual for my education.  :D

As to 4 or 5 octaves, most of what I play can be done on 4 octaves -- I'm not using styles/chord recognition. I'm done with three octave keybeds and I'm nearly done with mini-keys. I've been playing a Korg Microkey Air 49 lately and Santa brought an Arturia Keylab Essential 49 last week. Even Santa had supply chain issues.  8)

Can't wait to see what Yamaha has planned. They've actually had enough time to revise what they had in the pipe...

All the best to everyone -- pj

Offline pjd

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #66 on: January 15, 2022, 12:28:18 AM »
Just read the thread on the Casio forum.

The knob legends are different on the red model (CT-S1000V) and the grey model. So, there are two new models. The grey model does not have voice synthesis -- maybe a CT-S500?

Rear panel is very similar to the CT-S400. I think these two keyboards are extensions of the CT-S400 and will hit the street in the same neighborhood as E463 -- around $330 USD.

At least Casio isn't objecting to pre-release images in its forum. Note to Yamaha --  Lighten up.

-- pj
« Last Edit: January 15, 2022, 01:03:53 AM by pjd »
 

Offline SciNote

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #67 on: January 15, 2022, 03:25:34 AM »
Very interesting.  That vocal clip sounded really nice.  I'm also casting my vote for K1 and K2 meaning "Knob 1" and "Knob 2"

In the two videos, I looked at them back to back -- freezing the darkened image of the keyboard -- and I'm guessing that this is a 5 octave keyboard on both of those videos.  There seem to be at least 34 white keys -- and some are very likely hidden in the shadows -- so 36 would be very possible, which would be 5 octaves (5 times 7 white keys = 35 keys, plus the upper key so that the board goes from C to C instead of C to B).  But PLEASE, Casio, improve the QUALITY of the KEYBED!

If there is a five octave version, then that would increase my interest in it.  The vocal features sound nice.  It obviously has portamento -- at least one version of these keyboards, anyway.  I'll be looking for how straightforward the user interface is, and how much editing of sounds by way of filter, envelope, and other synth-type functions are available.  Though, I must admit, that my Roland Gaia synth satisfies my appetite for creating sounds.  But I would still need some tweaking, such as split, dual, independent control of octave and volume for each part, and DSP of some type.

But we'll see.  Maybe this will get Yamaha to get it in gear and at least start giving us some info about the E473, because Yamaha has served me well over the years, and I would certainly want to at least see what the E473 is capable of before buying any new main keyboard.

As for the connections visible on the back of the Casios?  Hard to say for sure.  One looks like a standard full-sized USB to device port.  A couple look like 3.5mm audio jacks (maybe for microphone and MP3 player?  Maybe it will have some basic vocoder function?).  Then there is whatever the cord is hooked to, which is likely either an audio connection or a power connection.  But I can't really make out the rest of it.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2022, 03:28:56 AM by SciNote »
Bob
Current: Yamaha PSR-E433, Roland GAIA SH-01, Casio CDP-200R, Casio MT-68 (wired to bass pedals)
Past: Yamaha PSR-520, PSR-510, PSR-500, DX-7, D-80 home organ, and a few Casios
 

Offline vbdx66

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #68 on: January 15, 2022, 06:33:08 AM »
Hi,

Yet another update. This thread on Gearspace contains some additional information:

https://gearspace.com/board/electronic-music-instruments-and-electronic-music-production/1369862-new-casio-synth-2022-woweee.html

Apparently the CT-S1000V will have a programmable arpeggiator. Pretty cool  8)

It also seems that a Bluetooth connection module will be included in the box with both the CT-S500 and the CT-S1000V, see attached screenshot (the link is dead).

If the CT-S1000V has 5 octaves, 2 assignable control knobs, speech synthesis (I also read something about an app to control speech synthesis), Bluetooth MIDI/Audio connectivity as well as the usual AiX sounds and auto-accompaniment features, Yamaha would better release their PSR E-473 very quickly.

Vinciane

Past keyboards: PSR E313, PSR E413, PSR E433, PSR S550, DGX 640, upright piano.
Now: DGX 650, Casio CT-X800.
 

Offline casiokid

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #69 on: January 15, 2022, 08:06:07 AM »
All this speculation about the new Casio keyboards is interesting, but Casio need to update their out of date styles (rhythms as Casio call them) to seriously compete with Yamaha and Korg
 

Offline pjd

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #70 on: January 15, 2022, 07:09:33 PM »
The more I think about the new Casio keyboards, the more they seem like extensions of the existing CT-S4-- line. I'm hoping for the new pianos, etc. that they put into the S1.

Nice catch as to the Bluetooth module, Vinciane! I've been experimenting with MIDI over Bluetooth and don't really see any reason to leave it out of a product anymore. Korg have an interesting implementation with Microkey Air. There's a little cover (like a battery cover) over an installable (replaceable) Bluetooth module. All's a manufacturer has to do is type qualify a module for a region (FCC in the USA, CE in Europe, etc.), then install the module into units intended for delivery/use in the region. Yamaha has qualified modules already. Let's go!

The AiX board in the CT-S400 is small and incredibly sparse. I may have to buy a Casio just to take it apart.  ;D

Yep, Yamaha had better not let grass grow under it's feet -- pj

Offline vbdx66

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #71 on: January 15, 2022, 08:18:35 PM »
Hi PJ,

Audio over Bluetooth is even sweeter. It means you could control an iPad app for instance the Korg iM1 app with the keyboard via Bluetooth, then have the iPad audio sent back to the keyboard. It also mean you could record your keyboard’s audio output wirelessly on an iPad or a laptop without the need of any audio interface. Pretty cool.

Yep, I’d like to get the exclusive voices of the CT-S1 on the new keyboards, too. I have been dreaming wildly over what I could begin with the Mellotron flute ;D

And: why on Earth would you want to tear a Casio keyboard apart to get your hands on the AiX board?

What I think AiX keyboards are needing is a computer-based patch editor, like those for the Yamaha DX7 or the Korg M1 in their time.

Regards,

Vinciane
Past keyboards: PSR E313, PSR E413, PSR E433, PSR S550, DGX 640, upright piano.
Now: DGX 650, Casio CT-X800.
 

Offline pjd

Re: Does anyone know about the PSR E-473 Yet.
« Reply #72 on: Yesterday at 12:45:57 AM »
And: why on Earth would you want to tear a Casio keyboard apart to get your hands on the AiX board?

Oh, I've been taking things apart since I was a kid.  :) Just taught the grandson how to remove screws from door hinges...

Well, I did the next best thing and looked through recent Casio patents on the US Patent and Trademark site:

http://sandsoftwaresound.net/recent-casio-patents-air-aix/

The voice synthesis stuff is an interesting application of deep neural nets. It'll be interesting to hear the CT-S1000V and see its app. Yamaha Vocaloid was very labor intensive. I couldn't imagine anyone devoting the time needed to make a good synthesized performance. It's got to be easy-peasy.

All the best -- pj