Author Topic: song accompaniment in fingered chord mode on two ways  (Read 740 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline janamdo

song accompaniment in fingered chord mode on two ways
« on: January 27, 2021, 12:08:02 PM »
Got here some study material : keyboardbasics  ( herb kraus )
I am for the next time practising...for a long time

With this book i see something different then in another methods when normally playing acmp on splitpoint g2
In keyboardbasics (herb kraus book the chords and inversion are presented on the Bass cleff
In this case, tonic, subdominant and dominant  from  Cmajor, and some more
The top note of a chord sequenze goes never higher then b2

This is whole different then i am used to be in the other keyboard learning methods
For playing from the keyboardbasics book i must chance splitpoint to b2 and the melody starts not below c3 (middle c)of course

Strange .. a song with a b2 note in it , while there is topnote b2 for a chord : how to play this?
This is whole new way op chords playing to learn
Is this a piano play approach ?

Suppose i learn also to play a chord sequenze as showed in the keyboardbasics book, then it conflict with the other two keyboardmethods i do have.

I am learning now two ways of chords playing with the acmp ?
I think i go on on the old way further for chordfingering and play the exercises from the book keyboardbasics on the old way.
Waiting on a dvd what is made from  cassete tapes from a  old Dutch keyboardcourse   
 
« Last Edit: January 27, 2021, 02:23:23 PM by janamdo »
 

Offline DerekA

Re: song accompaniment in fingered chord mode on two ways
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2021, 03:10:26 PM »
If you're playing in fingered mode, then the inversion does not matter - as long as you play C E and G you will get a C chord. It does not matter if it's CEG or EGC or GCE, nor does the octave matter within the chord detection area.

If you're playing fingered on bass, the inversion does matter because the lowest note is the bass note.

And if you're playing with the L voice active then it matters because those notes will sound.

So if you're using fingered mode, it makes no difference how you voice the chord. Use whatever you like!

Offline janamdo

Re: song accompaniment in fingered chord mode on two ways
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2021, 04:11:14 PM »


So if you're using fingered mode, it makes no difference how you voice the chord. Use whatever you like!
Thanks
That's a nice thing about this chord playing

But its my lessonsmaterial what's on two ways is presented.
- as chord symbols on score and splitpoint g2
- as written chords on  bass cleff and splitpoint on b2 

I prefer to play as with only chord symbols and this gives me the freedom what you mention  :D
« Last Edit: January 27, 2021, 11:46:45 PM by janamdo »
 

Offline panos

Re: song accompaniment in fingered chord mode on two ways
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2021, 09:10:12 PM »
Add a 3rd lesson to it Janambo:Leave the split point on F# where Yamaha put it on your keyboard (just joking  :D ).

If your right hand notes of a specific song are "entering" the left hand part,you can always "move" the right hand voices one octave down and play the song in one octave higher than you sheet music indicates.
That way you will play e.g.the piano voice at the octave of C4 with your right hand but you will actually hear like playing at the octave of C3.
But keep in mind that now your right hand has lesser keys to play that way and if you need to play a song with a melody line in 3 octaves you may have a problem.
(You will not have this problem if there is a small "break" in the melody so you can press another OTS or registartion button with the same voice but in a different octave).

The one who wrote the book maybe he had a keyboard with 76 keys but you have only 61 keys :)

Another way could be to play the song in a different key in order to maximize the right hand's availiable keys.

Offline janamdo

Re: song accompaniment in fingered chord mode on two ways
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2021, 11:58:20 PM »
Add a 3rd lesson to it Janambo:Leave the split point on F# where Yamaha put it on your keyboard (just joking  :D ).



The one who wrote the book maybe he had a keyboard with 76 keys but you have only 61 keys :)



Hi Panos
Thanks
The chords are played at a maximum topnote of b2 below c3 (middle c)
Melody starts at c3 ( middle c ) in the score examples.
A 76 key keyboard  does not chance this for a 61 keyboard  :D

Jan