Author Topic: Chord shortcuts  (Read 836 times)

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Offline Toril S

Chord shortcuts
« on: January 12, 2021, 09:26:03 PM »
Hello friends :) Controlling style I mostly use the fingered mode, and have played simple triads. When I want a 7th I just move one finger up two notes, still using just 3 fingers. I have tried using 4, but have not been able to detect any difference in the sound,  so I have gotten into this habit, and it is hard to start doing anything else. Have I been wrong all this time? Am I really missing something important here? Please advice me, my good and talented friends. :)
Toril S

Genos, Tyros 5, PSR S975, PSR 2100
and PSR-47.
Former keyboards: PSR-S970.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLVwWdb36Yd3LMBjAnm6pTQ?view_as=subscriber



Toril's PSR Performer Page
 

Online Fred Smith

Re: Chord shortcuts
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2021, 09:35:11 PM »
Hello friends :) Controlling style I mostly use the fingered mode, and have played simple triads. When I want a 7th I just move one finger up two notes, still using just 3 fingers. I have tried using 4, but have not been able to detect any difference in the sound,  so I have gotten into this habit, and it is hard to start doing anything else. Have I been wrong all this time? Am I really missing something important here? Please advice me, my good and talented friends. :)

As long as the chord you want (say, G7) is displayed on the screen, it doesn't matter how you play it. It will always sound the same regardless of how you finger it.

By the way, I didn't know you could get a 7th chord with only three fingers. Good to know.

Cheers,
Fred
Fred Smith,
Saskatoon, SK
Sun Lakes, AZ
Genos, Bose L1 compacts, Finale 2015
Check out my Registration Lessons
 

Offline janamdo

Re: Chord shortcuts
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2021, 10:46:06 AM »

By the way, I didn't know you could get a 7th chord with only three fingers. Good to know.

Cheers,
Fred
Take for example a D7 or E7 playing with 4 fingers is rather difficult, but now with 3 fingers it works too and much easier fo rme.
But what third finger to use ?  ;D
It depends on the chord progression too

Jan
 

Offline andyg

Re: Chord shortcuts
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2021, 03:49:05 PM »
I always get students to play 7ths with four fingers, with three main exceptions.

D7 - F# C D
E7 - G# D E
F7 - A Eb F

The first two can be tricky for people with less 'non-slim' fingers to get their third finger on the A or B without hitting the black keys on either side. F7 is really uncomfortable played F A (C) Eb, and making the often played F > F7 change (before a Bb most of the time) is simply a matter of moving the 2nd finger from C to Eb.

Of course it's possible to play all 7ths with just two or three notes in AI Fingered mode, but four notes makes for a more 'balanced' left hand - there are suggested chords and fingerings in some books and chord dictionaries that lead to 'wandering 5th' or 'waggling thumb', neither of which are desirable. Also, if you're playing your chords in the correct inversions, four note 7ths can make chord transitions a touch smoother.
It's not what you play, it's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

www.andrew-gilbert.com
 
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Offline Toril S

Re: Chord shortcuts
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2021, 03:52:43 PM »
Thanks andyg😀
Toril S

Genos, Tyros 5, PSR S975, PSR 2100
and PSR-47.
Former keyboards: PSR-S970.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLVwWdb36Yd3LMBjAnm6pTQ?view_as=subscriber



Toril's PSR Performer Page
 

Offline janamdo

Re: Chord shortcuts
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2021, 05:36:26 PM »
I always get students to play 7ths with four fingers, with three main exceptions.

D7 - F# C D
E7 - G# D E
F7 - A Eb F

Thanks
Good to know this now, makes playing easier

Jan
 
 

Offline andyg

Re: Chord shortcuts
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2021, 10:41:38 AM »
People might find this chord chart more useful than some of the chord dictionaries etc.

It groups chords in 'Circle of 5ths' order, so the common chords in any given key are in adjacent columns, and all the chords are as close to each other as possible - almost everything can be played within the range of F#1 to F#2. So you develop a 'lazy' left hand, lazy meaning that it doesn't have to move far, NOT that it doesn't have to do much!

As for 'exotics' and the wonders of AI chords, all that will appear in another format at some point.

It's not what you play, it's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

www.andrew-gilbert.com
 
The following users thanked this post: hans1966, john-s, DenFran246, wersianer, AndyMark, balcino

Offline Rick D.

Re: Chord shortcuts
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2021, 10:54:29 AM »
Thanks, Andy,

This chart will be very helpful. Sometimes using the Chord finder on the Genos is too time-consuming and it doesn't have all the chords.

Rick D.

 

Offline Toril S

Re: Chord shortcuts
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2021, 11:47:14 AM »
Thanks a lot Andy!
Toril S

Genos, Tyros 5, PSR S975, PSR 2100
and PSR-47.
Former keyboards: PSR-S970.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLVwWdb36Yd3LMBjAnm6pTQ?view_as=subscriber



Toril's PSR Performer Page
 

Offline janamdo

Re: Chord shortcuts
« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2021, 11:53:45 AM »
Thanks

Very helpful !

Jan
« Last Edit: January 14, 2021, 08:47:44 PM by janamdo »
 

Offline hans1966

Re: Chord shortcuts
« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2021, 12:40:58 AM »
Thank You very much,  Andy