Author Topic: How To Get Ritardando into a registration ??  (Read 530 times)

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Offline joca

How To Get Ritardando into a registration ??
« on: October 14, 2020, 02:13:58 PM »
I was going to post this to an old topic but as it was a couple of years old I thought I would post as new topic although I am sure it isn't.
As the title says how do I get a  Ritardando (slow down) into a registration.
I have read all about doing it manually i.e. with sliders etc but I would like to see if it can be done by pedal via a reg.
Johnnie
 

Offline Fred Smith

Re: How To Get Ritardando into a registration ??
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2020, 02:20:44 PM »
I was going to post this to an old topic but as it was a couple of years old I thought I would post as new topic although I am sure it isn't.
As the title says how do I get a  Ritardando (slow down) into a registration.
I have read all about doing it manually i.e. with sliders etc but I would like to see if it can be done by pedal via a reg.

Canít be done. You canít store a ritard in a registration.

The alternative is to store reduced tempos in successive registrations. In my experience, this matches the song better than a ritard.

Cheers,
Fred
Fred Smith,
Saskatoon, SK
Sun Lakes, AZ
Genos, Bose L1 compacts, Finale 2015
Check out my Registration Lessons
 

Online Normanfernandez

Re: How To Get Ritardando into a registration ??
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2020, 02:21:28 PM »
You set an ending to the Registration Memory and hit the Ending button again.

Or you could create your own Tempo change in the Style ( Mix Master could do it )

Hope this helps
Regards Norman.
 

Offline andyg

Re: How To Get Ritardando into a registration ??
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2020, 07:57:43 PM »
My students and I do this all the time! Go with Fred's suggestion.

Save a registration. Keep the sounds and style the same but lower the tempo and save into the next registration, then again and again. How many times and how much to slow down depends on you and the song. Set up a Registration Sequence that will allow you to step through the registrations in order. As a Registration Sequence can call up the next bank of registrations, there's effectively no limit to how many registrations you can have in a song. Just needs a little planning and forethought!
It's not what you play, it's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

www.andrew-gilbert.com
 

Offline Hammond Yamaha

Re: How To Get Ritardando into a registration ??
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2020, 05:22:28 PM »
Setting the rit in several registration in my mind would not be a smooth transition.  A few years ago, I created a midi file and edited the song in Cakewalk (which I no longer use ) and it worked perfect with a gradual. Slow down letís say from measure 145 to 155.  So it will work in midi.

Frank.
 

Offline mikf

Re: How To Get Ritardando into a registration ??
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2020, 08:40:26 AM »
Like Andy says small steps in tempo will appear smooth. In reality that is what musicians are actually doing. Your ear will tell you how much of a step and how many steps is just right.
Mike

Offline Genos!

Re: How To Get Ritardando into a registration ??
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2020, 02:28:10 PM »
Well, I don't disagree to what is being said, because it all makes sense.

Back in my band days it was the conductor who controlled the tempo and also his body language controlled the feel and also the expression and dynamic loudness.

(Of course it was all written in the music, or we were allowed to edit our music to taste adding notes, whatever...)

And it was through practice that things like the speed of the music were also keyed to what the conductor wanted from the band. And it was important that we learned more to follow him should he choose to express a song differently.

So, the tempo was not geared toward a number of measures, or even toward a whole measure, but was definitely on a note-per-note basis. And this is what we did as musicians (to learn to follow).

Now obviously the midi keyboards can follow explicitly, even to a more finer point than humanly possible. However, in midi a tempo map is used. Now I don't know how to incorporate a midi map into your particular setup. But I do know how to create one.

In most DAWs you can set the tempo to a certain location, and it doesn't even have to be at the start of a bar in some DAWs. When you set the tempo marker, there is an option to gradually change tempo up until the next tempo marker, etc.

There is also a feature available (at least in Reaper) to modify the tempo on a curve to better fit how you want the tempo to vary. Once you create the tempo map you can import it into any sequencer.

If you can get this tempo map to vary the tempo of the keyboard, then you've accomplished what you want and it will have the fine changes in tempo included within it.

If you can't get this tempo map to vary the tempo of the keyboard, then I guess using registrations will have to do. However, I have noticed (I believe) that there are some style endings that do slow down toward the end of a song. So maybe it's possible to use one of those or make up your own.

I know the theory and the mechanics, but I don't know the keyboard intricacies.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2020, 02:29:34 PM by Genos! »
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Offline andyg

Re: How To Get Ritardando into a registration ??
« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2020, 10:13:12 PM »
Setting the rit in several registration in my mind would not be a smooth transition.  A few years ago, I created a midi file and edited the song in Cakewalk (which I no longer use ) and it worked perfect with a gradual. Slow down letís say from measure 145 to 155.  So it will work in midi.

Frank.

But we're talking registrations for use in live performance here. It's simple in a DAW, open the Tempo Track and draw a line down or type in values. I do it all the time when recording to MIDI and then post-editing.

But I can assure you that this technique works very well in a live situation, the values you change in the registrations have to be chosen carefully, as does the number of steps, but if done properly, it can sound very smooth. As I said, I've had students doing this for years. It's been noted favourably by examiners - most candidates tend to ignore rits and ralls in keyboard music, and sometimes their keyboards can't do it - and has contributed to a more than a few 20 out of 20 marks for an exam piece.
It's not what you play, it's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

www.andrew-gilbert.com