Author Topic: I hope I didn't damage my PSR-E433...  (Read 3316 times)

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Offline SciNote

I hope I didn't damage my PSR-E433...
« on: December 31, 2017, 10:13:53 AM »
So, here's what happened.  I transported the keyboard because I'm staying at my Dad's home a few days, and then I temporarily placed the keyboard on it's edge, resting up against a chair, on a tile floor.  Suddenly, it started slide out away from the chair, and I was too far away to stop it.  When it slid out far enough that the upper side was about 16-18 inches (40-45 cm) off the floor, it then just dropped the rest of the way -- SLAM! -- and the side even bounced a few inches.  It was the bottom of the keyboard the slammed into the floor.  Everything looks okay -- no cracks or visible damage.  And the sound seems normal, though I'm running it on batteries for the first time (I left the AC adapter at home and don't have access to it right now).

However, there is one sound that has characteristics that I did not notice before.  It is the Dynamic Overdrive sound (in the guitars section of the panel voices).  It is sound number 40 on the E433, likely a different number on the E443 and E453.  When I hit the key softly, that sound quickly fades out, almost like a (distorted, as expected) plucked string.  But when I hit the key harder, the sound lingers on for much longer.  Is this normal for this sound?  I never noticed this before.
Bob
Current: Yamaha PSR-E433, Roland GAIA SH-01, Casio CDP-200R, Casio MT-68 (wired to bass pedals)
Past: Yamaha PSR-520, PSR-510, PSR-500, DX-7, D-80 home organ, and a few Casios
 

Offline vbdx66

Re: I hope I didn't damage my PSR-E433...
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2017, 12:06:46 PM »
Hi Bob,

It would be quite strange indeed if you keyboard were functioning completely normally excepted for one sound. This sound is called "Dynamic Overdrive", and the characteristic of the "Dynamic" range of sounds is precisely that the sound varies depending on how hard you hit the keys. So my guess is that your keyboard is perfectly fine.

Unfortunately I don't have the E 433 anymore so I won't be able to test this, maybe another Forum user will try it out for you.

Best Regards and a nice New Year's Eve,

Vinciane.
Past keyboards: PSR E313, PSR E413, PSR E433, PSR S550, DGX 640, upright piano.
Now: DGX 650, Casio CT-X800.
 

Offline SciNote

Re: I hope I didn't damage my PSR-E433...
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2017, 12:44:15 PM »
Yeah, that's what I was thinking.  But of course, I haven't checked all 600+ sounds, so if there is an issue, it could just be that I have only noticed it with one sound so far, but that still seems unlikely.  However, as this sound is likely on the E443 and E453 as well, I would appreciate it if anyone with any of these keyboards checks out that sound to see if behaves this way.  The only thing that concerns me is that this sound is part of one of my registrations, and I just never noticed that quick-fade-out at low-key-velocity characteristic before.

Happy New Year to you, too!
Bob
Current: Yamaha PSR-E433, Roland GAIA SH-01, Casio CDP-200R, Casio MT-68 (wired to bass pedals)
Past: Yamaha PSR-520, PSR-510, PSR-500, DX-7, D-80 home organ, and a few Casios
 

Offline SeaGtGruff

Re: I hope I didn't damage my PSR-E433...
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2017, 01:34:39 PM »
Whenever I prop up my keyboards rather than laying them down flat, I prefer to rest the back edge against the floor and have the front edge lifted up against the wall (or whatever), since the back is thicker (taller in height) than the front, and I think it's also heavier. I've heard that standing a keyboard on either end is bad, but I think that was referring to leaving it that way for extended periods-- i.e., storing it that way-- rather than standing it up that way temporarily.

Anyway, let's hope nothing was damaged or loosened inside.

I just checked that voice on my PSR-E433, and it sounds just as you described it-- so either it's working normally on your keyboard, or it's messed up exactly the same way on my keyboard. :)

I haven't checked it on my PSR-E443 for comparison yet, but I'm expecting it to sound the same.
Michael Rideout
Current keyboards: Yamaha YPT-400, PSR-E433, PSR-E443, PSR-EW400, MX49 BK
Current controllers: M-Audio Axiom 61-II
Previous keyboards: Farfisa Matador 611; Casio CTK-710
 

Offline vbdx66

Re: I hope I didn't damage my PSR-E433...
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2017, 02:30:24 PM »
From my past experience, Yamaha keyboards are usually very solidly built  :) :) :)

Regards,

Vinciane
Past keyboards: PSR E313, PSR E413, PSR E433, PSR S550, DGX 640, upright piano.
Now: DGX 650, Casio CT-X800.