Author Topic: NEW TO FORUM WITH QUESTION ABOUT PSR-EW400  (Read 4713 times)

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ALYM

  • Guest
NEW TO FORUM WITH QUESTION ABOUT PSR-EW400
« on: December 19, 2017, 06:09:17 AM »
I have had this keyboard for about one week.  I am very new to keyboards and attempting to learn to play it.  One issue that I have noticed is that the Touch Response feature of the keyboard returns to the default setting the next time the instrument is turned on.  Is there any work around?  The Registration Memory function does not have an option for saving this setting.

Now I just have to learn to play it.  I am discovering learning to play a musical instrument is a difficult task.

Thank you
 

Offline SciNote

Re: NEW TO FORUM WITH QUESTION ABOUT PSR-EW400
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2017, 08:49:08 AM »
I checked the manual for that keyboard, and page 39 indicates that the Touch Response setting should be stored and remembered even after the power is turned off.  If this setting is not being saved on your keyboard, I'm not sure what the reason would be.  The setting of the Touch Response seems pretty straightforward -- the manual (page 42) just indicates to call up that function and then make the setting using the data wheel.  It doesn't refer to any special "save" procedure to do after you make the selection of the touch response level.

I'd say to try it again, and if it still doesn't save, then maybe it is a defect, and you'd want to check with the store where you bought it or with Yamaha directly.

Now, if the issue is that certain sounds don't seem to have any touch response, even after you turn that feature on, that could potentially be due to the fact that certain sounds, like most of the organs, are not programmed to use touch response, because a real organ does not generally have touch-responsive keys.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2017, 08:50:46 AM by SciNote »
Bob
Current: Yamaha PSR-E433, Roland GAIA SH-01, Casio CDP-200R, Casio MT-68 (wired to bass pedals)
Past: Yamaha PSR-520, PSR-510, PSR-500, DX-7, D-80 home organ, and a few Casios
 
The following users thanked this post: SeaGtGruff

Re: NEW TO FORUM WITH QUESTION ABOUT PSR-EW400
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2017, 01:31:51 PM »
Checking for TouchRes level on keyboard is a bit tricky. You have to go to Functions category, proceed till TouchRes function, and then wait for a few seconds for the value to show up. Maybe you have been messing around switching buttons, and confused in between the set value and pressing of Keys, this is just a guess, because even I have gone through such a situation earlier.
Anupam
Owning : Roland XPS-30, Casio SA-21
Previously : Yamaha PSR-E453
 

ALYM

  • Guest
Re: NEW TO FORUM WITH QUESTION ABOUT PSR-EW400
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2017, 04:51:55 AM »
I just checked the touch response setting and it is now keeping the previously set value.  It is kind of slow displaying function parameters - so maybe I did not wait long enough before.

Thank you for your feedback.

Now I just have to learn to play this instrument.  To play properly, do you have be able to avoid looking at where your hands are on the keyboard and just look at the sheet music?  I am working on two things to start.

1. Learn the musical scale so that the correct notes are identified right away on sheet music.
2. Correctly find each key without the use of labels.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you again.


 

Offline SciNote

Re: NEW TO FORUM WITH QUESTION ABOUT PSR-EW400
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2017, 07:36:16 AM »
Glad to hear you got the touch response figured out.  Yes, with some settings, you do have to wait a few seconds to see the value because the LCD display will display other information, such as the name of the function, before it cycles to displaying the value for that function.

When learning to play, the ability to just "feel" your way around the keyboard will come naturally.  When I started learning to play, I learned the notes to all of the basic chords (major, minor, 7th, minor 7th, diminished, diminished 7th) in all keys.  For learning where the keys are without using labels, a good trick that I used was just to remember that the white key immediately to the left of the cluster of two black keys is a "C", and the white key immediately to the left of the cluster of three black keys is an "F", other notes are in a repeating order from "A" to "G" (so that, for example, once you identify the "C", the white key just to the right is a "D", and the white key just to the right of that is an "E", and so on), and this is true for any octave on the keyboard.

Although I did not start with scales right away, it is a good practice to learn scales as well, as that is good finger exercise.

I also worked on learning music theory, so I could identify the key of a song by the number of sharps or flats in the key signature (the "Circle of Fifths"), as well as the construction of more complex chords.
Bob
Current: Yamaha PSR-E433, Roland GAIA SH-01, Casio CDP-200R, Casio MT-68 (wired to bass pedals)
Past: Yamaha PSR-520, PSR-510, PSR-500, DX-7, D-80 home organ, and a few Casios
 

Re: NEW TO FORUM WITH QUESTION ABOUT PSR-EW400
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2018, 06:53:13 PM »
In my opinion, you should start learning from leads' notes on right hand. Try to learn and play the lead notes of song and repeat it, in that way you will slowly but effectively learn the major part of playing. As Bob (Scinote) said, the ability to play comes naturally with time, but all you need is patience and continuous efforts. There would be times when you'd feel disappointed at your performance, and start comparing yourself with advanced players, but that phase will go away soon. The secret to learning is PLAY-REPEAT.
Once you find yourself comfortable enough in lead playing, start investing your time on chord notes playing, with two fingers and further with three.. You have to remember scales on keybed, it will make that easier. You should not use the transpose function on your keyboard, unless you become an intermediate to advanced level player.
Please note : My entire tips are based on practical playing experience, of ten years. I got no theoretical education on playing keyboards, or sheet music, or playing by notations etc. Following my tips, it might take you much longer than usual to learn, but it totally depends on your individual efforts. Still I would recommend you to join a music school or similar program. Have a nice day !
Anupam
Owning : Roland XPS-30, Casio SA-21
Previously : Yamaha PSR-E453
 

Offline alans

Re: NEW TO FORUM WITH QUESTION ABOUT PSR-EW400
« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2018, 09:14:06 PM »
Hi

I learned from the Kenneth Baker series of books,I found them very good.
Learning the keyboard can get very frustrating at first,you just want to play some nice tunes 😂😂 ,At first try to learn songs that you know well,then you can hear when you are playing it wrong.The books are available in the UK,not sure about the USA


Good luck

Alan 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Complete-Keyboard-Player-Bk/dp/071193648X/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1515014245&sr=1-3&keywords=kenneth+baker+keyboard+books
Previous keyboards-Yamaha PSR 410,Technics KN2000,KN5000,KN6000 , KN7000 and Tyros5
 

ALYM

  • Guest
Re: NEW TO FORUM WITH QUESTION ABOUT PSR-EW400
« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2018, 05:20:05 AM »
Thank you for the helpful replies.

I am currently working on playing just the "melody" (right hand) part at this time.  I have been making my own sheet music so that it is easier to read and to learn the symbols found on sheet music.  I read the note names out loud for the entire piece of music away from the keyboard without any reference documents.  I repeat this procedure until I am able to recite the names without hesitation.  I have found that this is improving my ability to remember the notes on the scale when I am at the keyboard.  I am now able to play the music more smoothly as a result.  I am working on my fingering skills to help with finding the right key with more repeatability and less pressing of the adjacent key in error.  I understand the value of practice to build skill and confidence.