Author Topic: More fun with Chord Tracker  (Read 4290 times)

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Offline pjd

More fun with Chord Tracker
« on: November 04, 2015, 07:23:07 AM »
Hi --

I have been using the Yamaha Chord Tracker app to figure out the chords to some tunes. Chord Tracker analyzes the music in an MP3/audio file and displays a chord chart.

Chord Tracker can do much, much more! Yamaha really needs to produce a manual for this app to reveal all of these functions.

First, you can change the chords in the chord chart. If you don't like a chord, just tap the chord and select a new one. Chord Tracker does a pretty decent job of identifying chords in "simple" music. For example, it did a great job with Hot Chocolate's "Every 1's A Winner." (My guilty pleasure.) It didn't do such a good job with Groovy Waters downtempo "Wicked Game." The jazz chords (Dm/Eb, come on, man) threw Chord Tracker off. No problem, just edit the chord chart.

Next, you can send the chord progression to your PSR/Tyros. The Yamaha web site touts wireless connection, but you can send the song file via wired USB. I transferred the chord progression to my S950 using the Apple Camera Connection kit. (My iPad is a gen 4 running iOS9, BTW.)

The Yamaha web page for Chord Tracker states that Chord Tracker is compatible with the currently listed "Related Products." That is true. However, Chord Tracker worked successfully with the S950 (not listed). So, even though you don't own the latest and greatest, please give this capability a try.

On the iPad side, you need to establish a connection from Chord Tracker to your keyboard. Plug in the Camera Connection Kit and USB cable first. Then select your instrument in the Connection box on Chord Tracker's main screen.

Choose an audio song to transcribe to a chord chart and turn Chord Tracker loose. Once you have a chord chart, tap the upload icon, i.e., that square box with an arrow shooting upward. Then tap the "Send to Instrument" button. Chord Tracker pops up a dialog in which you can enter/change the name of the song file to be created on the arranger workstation. Tap SEND and Chord Tracker sends the song file to the arranger.

Chord Tracker stores the song file in the arranger's internal drive. It creates a directory named "ChordTracker" and stores the song file in this directory. Any other song file that you create this way is stored in the "ChordTracker" directory.

Press the SONG SELECT button on the arranger to find and select the song file. Navigate to the USER tab of the internal drive and then press the corresponding button for the "ChordTracker" directory. Then press the corresponding button for the song file itself, e.g., "every1s", which is the name that I gave to the Every 1's A Winner song file.

Press the play button. The arranger will play back the song using the currently selected style and section. Now have fun changing the style, section, tempo and so forth. You can change the style, section, etc. in real time while the song plays, making it easy to tune the song to your sonic wishes.

Of course, you can dive into SONG CREATOR and tweak away. The System Exclusive TAB reveals much of the magic behind the scenes.

Chord Tracker generates three MIDI metadata records for time signature, key signature and tempo, followed by three System Exclusive messages:

    F0 7E 7F 09 01 F7             GM reset
    F0 43 10 4C 00 00 7E 00 F7    XG system ON
    F0 43 60 7A F7                Accompaniment start

The preamble is followed by a slew of Yamaha System Exclusive messages for the chord changes:

    F0 43 7E 02 34 00 34 7F F7    Chord control (F maj/F)
    F0 43 7E 00 08 7F F7          Section control (MAIN A ON)
    F0 43 7E 02 23 00 23 7F F7    Chord control (Eb maj/Eb)

Chord Tracker does not generate the Yamaha proprietary CdS1 chunk in the MIDI file. All playback is controlled by metadata and System Exclusive messages.
 
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Offline John Plumridge

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2015, 02:32:50 AM »
Thanks pjd
                           Until reading your post I had ignored Chord Tracker as I did not appreciate that it may work with Tyros5

When time allows I will take a look and see what it has to offer.

Keep up the good work

Jo0hn

Tyros 3 & Tyros 5
My musical performances are better than they sound !
 

Offline jm

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2015, 04:00:34 AM »
Hi pjd
many thanks for all of your input on the Chord Tracker app.
Kind regards
Jan (jm)
Late Learner! Not blessed with any musical ability!☹️ But love music!  I use headphones so as not offend my husband or anyone else 😂Tyros 3 now Tyros 5.
 

Offline chikitin

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2017, 12:29:14 PM »
Hi,

Thank you for sharing your knowledge with us. I was wondering how I could import midi into a notation software or cubase so that it retains the Chord names/information.

Using finale, when I import the midi file, it shows empty score with single staff and absolutely no Chord.
Using Cubase, I get two tracks after import, the track names are SysEx Data and Chord Data however, these don't have any information in them. Please see the attached screen shot.

I don't really care about retaining the sections, but it would be nice to be able to import them as well.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

CS

Online Roger Brenizer

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2017, 01:01:09 PM »
I use Notation Composer3 if I want to import chords into a music notation program, CS.  My preferred music notation program is MuseScore and at the present time it does not import chord data.  Purportedly, this feature is coming in the future.

Here is what I presently do:

1) Import a midi file into Notation Composer3 and generate the chord data

2) Export the midi file and change the name if desired

3) Open the new midi file in MuseScore for further editing and cleanup

4) Save the file in MuseScore format and export the file as a PDF or other various file formats, as desired
"Music Is My Life"
My best regards,
Roger

(The older I get...the better I used to be...LOL!!!)
Rogerís PSR Performer Page
 
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Offline pjd

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2017, 06:05:08 AM »
Hi CS --

Sounds like you want to import a MIDI file into a DAW (e.g., Cubase, SONAR) or some other tool (e.g., Sibelius, Finale) and turn the file into musical notation including chord symbols.

Roger is right on. (Thanks, Roger!) Myself, I use the Sibelius First notation editor. After importing the MIDI file into First, I use First's "Add Chord Symbols" plug-in to get chord symbols. The plug-in analyzes the (MIDI) notes and inserts chord symbols into the musical score.

You mentioned Cubase. I only have Cubase Elements, so notation editing is limited. If you check out the Cubase manual under "Chord Editing Section," there is an option/button for "Make Chords". This is supposed to perform a chord analysis on the (selected) MIDI part. Cubase Elements doesn't seem to support chord symbols in its Score editor. Maybe the full version can create symbols from the chord track?

Of course, Steinberg would now like everyone to upgrade to Dorico...

Yamaha's ChordTracker does not currently integrate with Cubase or any other software tool. Not to confuse things too much, but ChordTracker inserts its own proprietary MIDI messages into the file that it creates. The arrangers understand these messages, but other editing tools like Cubase do not know how to interpret them.

Hope this helps out -- pj
 
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Offline chikitin

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2017, 08:01:47 AM »
I use Notation Composer3 if I want to import chords into a music notation program, CS.  My preferred music notation program is

Thank you for the solution, Roger. However, the trial version of the NC3 does not allow saving as MIDI or export. It will cost me about 100 dollars that is not cheap. I guess I have to check other avenues.

Thank you so much again.

Chekad
 

Offline chikitin

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2017, 08:28:15 AM »
Hi CS --

Sounds like you want to import a MIDI file into a DAW (e.g., Cubase, SONAR) or some other tool (e.g., Sibelius, Finale) and turn the file into musical notation including chord symbols.


Thank you PJ. I tried your method. Unfortunately Cubase does not recognize the symbol as NC3 did! Unfortunately, I don't have First notation software either.
 

Online Roger Brenizer

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2017, 10:04:25 AM »
It should be noted that if a midi file already contains chord data, MuseScore will display the chords for the song.  Not all midi files need to be processed through another notation program to first extract the chords.

One word of warning when extracting chord data using Notation Composer 3.  You'll need to play the song through with the chords generated by the program to see if they are correct.  Invariably I need to pencil in a few corrected chords because the program doesn't always display the proper chords.  Then I  simply edit them in MuseScore.

There are other free solutions to generating chord data for a song.  I'll try to return to this thread when I have more time and give you some other options.
"Music Is My Life"
My best regards,
Roger

(The older I get...the better I used to be...LOL!!!)
Rogerís PSR Performer Page
 
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Offline chikitin

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2017, 10:13:52 AM »
I'll try to return to this thread when I have more time and give you some other options.

Thank you so much.

Online Roger Brenizer

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2017, 01:11:41 PM »
Hi Chikitin,

I just discovered a Plugin for MuseScore that will automatically produce chords for the entire score.  Please let me know if you're interested in using MuseScore and this Plugin.  MuseScore is free so this will be a possible solution for you if you are willing to spend the time to learn another music notation program.  I use it for most of my music needs and have written an article about it's use on the PSR Tutorial website.

If you tell me you're interested I'll post the download links for you and the link to my article.  :)
"Music Is My Life"
My best regards,
Roger

(The older I get...the better I used to be...LOL!!!)
Rogerís PSR Performer Page
 
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Offline chikitin

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #11 on: May 17, 2017, 02:03:12 PM »
Hi Chikitin,

I just discovered a Plugin for MuseScore that will automatically produce chords for the entire score.  Please let me know if you're interested in using MuseScore and this Plugin.  MuseScore is free so this will be a possible solution for you if you are willing to spend the time to learn another music notation program.  I use it for most of my music needs and have written an article about it's use on the PSR Tutorial website.

If you tell me you're interested I'll post the download links for you and the link to my article.  :)
Thank you very much Roger and I am indeed very interested. I would love to read your article and will surely try it.

Online Roger Brenizer

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #12 on: May 17, 2017, 05:07:40 PM »
Hi Chikitin,

Here are the links, as requested.  The first one is the download link to the current version of MuseScore 2.1.  The second link is  for the Chord Plugin, which is used to automatically create chords for your score.  The third and last link is to the article I wrote about importing a midi file into MuseScore and creating a lead sheet.  There are also instructions for creating a lead sheet from a PDF file.

1) https://musescore.org/en/download

2) https://musescore.org/en/project/chordidentifier

3) https://www.psrtutorial.com/music/articles/museScore.html

If you have any questions, please feel free to ask.  :)
"Music Is My Life"
My best regards,
Roger

(The older I get...the better I used to be...LOL!!!)
Rogerís PSR Performer Page
 
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Offline chikitin

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #13 on: May 17, 2017, 07:09:17 PM »
Hi Chikitin,

Here are the links, as requested.  The first one is the download link to the current version of MuseScore 2.1.  The second link is  for the Chord Plugin, which is used to automatically create chords for your score.  The third and last link is to the article I wrote about importing a midi file into MuseScore and creating a lead sheet.  There are also instructions for creating a lead sheet from a PDF file.


Thank you Roger for the plug-in. I just tried it. It works for the type of files your described; scores that contain measures with note events. However, in my case, the MIDI file is created using my PSR keyboard and contains only Meta Data for 192 measure without any notes. I have attached it. When I load the MIDI, it does not show any measure. However, Notation Composer 3, is showing measures with chords perfectly.

Thank you very much again. I read your article and bio! you are great man just like most good musicians!

CS
 
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Online Roger Brenizer

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #14 on: May 17, 2017, 07:34:25 PM »
Thank you for your overly gracious words, CS.   :-[

Thank you for the included midi file created using your keyboard.  I'll have a look at it.  :)
"Music Is My Life"
My best regards,
Roger

(The older I get...the better I used to be...LOL!!!)
Rogerís PSR Performer Page
 

Online Roger Brenizer

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #15 on: May 17, 2017, 08:18:17 PM »
Hi CS,

So you played no melody line when you recorded this midi file on your keyboard and were only playing chords.  Is this correct?

The MuseScore chord plugin would only work if the midi file carried a melody line, which is what the plugin uses to analyze the chord data.  By adding a note to the first and last measures of the midi file, the midi file will now open in MuseScore; however, without a melody line the chord plugin still won't produce any chords, but all measures are now visible.

I've attached the modified midi file, for whatever it's worth, so you can view the result.
"Music Is My Life"
My best regards,
Roger

(The older I get...the better I used to be...LOL!!!)
Rogerís PSR Performer Page
 

Offline chikitin

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #16 on: May 17, 2017, 09:07:53 PM »
Thank you very much, Roger. Your suggestions were certainly very helpful. Anyhow, I figured out how to do it in Cubase after hours playing with Cubase setting.

Online Roger Brenizer

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2017, 09:20:40 PM »
You're welcome and I'm glad to know you figured out how to do it in Cubase, CS.  Nothing was wasted and much knowledge was gained for your future music arsenal.

When a member of the forum mentions this dilemma, relative to Cubase, you will be prepared to lend a helping hand from this experience and pass on your knowledge.  :)
"Music Is My Life"
My best regards,
Roger

(The older I get...the better I used to be...LOL!!!)
Rogerís PSR Performer Page
 
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Offline Joe H

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #18 on: May 18, 2017, 08:05:31 AM »
Sometimes I'm a little reluctant to recommend Midiworks (or StyleMagic) lest people think I'm getting some financial compensation for it... which I'm NOT.

These are just great programs.    http://www.midisoft.pl/en/

So I will suggest you might try Midiworks to add chord data to a MIDI song file.  It takes just about 30 seconds to do that. When you save your MIDi file the chord tags will be retained in the file.

 8)

Joe H
Music is the Universal Language!

My Article: Using Multi Pads for EDM. Download Regs, Styles & MPs:  http://psrtutorial.com/music/articles/dancemusic.html
 
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Offline chikitin

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #19 on: May 19, 2017, 01:52:14 PM »
Sometimes I'm a little reluctant to recommend Midiworks (or StyleMagic) lest people think I'm getting some financial compensation for it... which I'm NOT.

These are just great programs.    http://www.midisoft.pl/en/

So I will suggest you might try Midiworks to add chord data to a MIDI song file.  It takes just about 30 seconds to do that. When you save your MIDi file the chord tags will be retained in the file.

 8)

Joe H

I don't mind paying for software if it does what I want. The site is seems very interesting. I do think the intelligent people who take their times to promote art and to write these programs must be compensated (via purchasing or donation) and should be appreciated more. They sometimes risk their jobs and write them aside from their jobs! Anyhow, Thanks for sharing the link.
 

Offline Joe H

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #20 on: May 19, 2017, 05:15:08 PM »
There is a demo version of Midiworks YA you can download and try.  It is fully functional except for the SAVE function.  After you load a MIDI file, click on the Multieditor Icon at the top-right.  This opens the Piano Roll screen (Multieditor).  You will see a box on the right to create chords.  There is a second Auto Chord button at the top right of the screen.

When you click on this button, Midiworks YA will generate Yamaha chord tags that will be recognized by our arranger keyboards.

Joe H
« Last Edit: May 19, 2017, 10:32:00 PM by Joe H »
Music is the Universal Language!

My Article: Using Multi Pads for EDM. Download Regs, Styles & MPs:  http://psrtutorial.com/music/articles/dancemusic.html
 

Online Roger Brenizer

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #21 on: May 19, 2017, 05:40:52 PM »
Don't ever be reluctant to mention Midiworks or StyleMagic, Joe.  We all know you don't receive any remuneration for your recommendations.

I recently mentioned, in another topic, that my demo version of StyleMagic had expired and I could no longer review it.  I didn't think that the demo should expire, but it just stopped functioning long ago and I simply ceased using it.  I started it up yesterday and it's now working again.  I may purchase both programs, but I have a question for you with regard to the validity of chords produced by Midiworks.

I find that no matter what program I use to produce chords for a song, the chords always need to be modified due to the insertion of erroneous chords.  What's been your experience with this issue regarding this program?  I value your expertise.  :)

I've been using Notation Composer 3 and MuseScore2 to display chords and they both usually need editing.  I always need to sit and play the song through and pencil in a few erroneous chords or delete some of them completely.
"Music Is My Life"
My best regards,
Roger

(The older I get...the better I used to be...LOL!!!)
Rogerís PSR Performer Page
 

Offline Joe H

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #22 on: May 19, 2017, 10:55:34 PM »
Hi Roger,

I mostly work with style files.  I don't use or edit MIDI songs files vary often or enough to be able to answer your question. 

I think it is likely that there are some incorrect chord types interpreted by Midiworks as well, because if more than one channel (track) has chords recorded on them, I can only assume the program (as may be the case with all programs that generate chord information) is analyzing all tracks at once and may combine (or confuse) collective note data from two or more tracks to formulate and identify the actual chords that were recorded in the sequence.

I have never attempted to verify the accuracy of Midiworks Auto Chord function.

Sorry... that's not any real help.   I suppose one way to test the accuracy would be to load a song file that you know the chords very well, then delete them in the Multieditor and then let Midiworks YA generate the chords and see just how good a job it really does.    ???

Joe H

 
Music is the Universal Language!

My Article: Using Multi Pads for EDM. Download Regs, Styles & MPs:  http://psrtutorial.com/music/articles/dancemusic.html
 

Online Roger Brenizer

Re: More fun with Chord Tracker
« Reply #23 on: May 19, 2017, 11:23:54 PM »
Thank you for your input, Joe.  Your take on chord analysis is much the same as mine.  There's simply too much going on with all the tracks combined to determine proper chord values, which is why I sit and play the song and then make manual adjustments.  Sometimes I really cringe when I play what was interpreted.  As I iterated to someone recently; Heck, I've seen sheet music and music books with improper chord values, so it's certainly no surprise that software programs get it wrong too.

I like your suggestion, as follows: I suppose one way to test the accuracy would be to load a song file that you know the chords very well, then delete them in the Multieditor and then let Midiworks YA generate the chords and see just how good a job it really does.

If it's successful, I would probably want to test it on more than one song file to determine if the capability is repetitive.

As I previously said, Joe, I value your expertise and your opinions.  And yes, your reply was helpful.  :)
"Music Is My Life"
My best regards,
Roger

(The older I get...the better I used to be...LOL!!!)
Rogerís PSR Performer Page