Author Topic: Exporting/Transferring a Recorded Song  (Read 447 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Piotr Pulawski

Exporting/Transferring a Recorded Song
« on: October 31, 2017, 02:49:18 AM »
Hello Everyone,

please excuse me, I'm not sure if a question like this is supposed to go in this section, but I'll ask anyway:

I have composed a song and recorded it on my Yamaha E333, but now I'd like to be able to make it available to a friend who's an indy music producer to add some bells and whistles.

I'm finding it difficult to figure out how I should go about doing that; the board does have a USB slot ad I can connect it to my PC and transfer files between the two devices. The problem is that the board's OS seems to take whatever's recorded on the 5 memory slots available in this keyboard and lump it together into one SFF or SMF (I'm not sure which) file, but it seems as though transferring this file is only meant as a backup solution, and not really as a way of exporting music for further processing.

Thank you for any and all input,
YAMAHA PSR-E333, EW400
 

Offline Piotr Pulawski

Re: Exporting/Transferring a Recorded Song
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2017, 09:32:12 AM »
It seems as though the information I provided in my last post was partially incorrect, my apologies.

It seems as though the file that all the songs recorded onto the 5 registration slots is a .BUP type file, and not an SMF file.

I've tried renaming the extension of this .BUP file to .mid, but none of the media players on my PC will play it anyway.
YAMAHA PSR-E333, EW400
 

Offline travlin-easy

Re: Exporting/Transferring a Recorded Song
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2017, 12:20:59 PM »
Peter, you will likely have to rename the file using the DOS window of your computer. I used to do this many years ago, but unfortunately, I'm not confident in the actual command required. I believe it was "ren*.*.bup *.*.mid

Hope this helps,

Gary 8)
Love Those Yammies...
 

Re: Exporting/Transferring a Recorded Song
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2017, 05:51:41 AM »
If you are supposed to extract a musical track, or more elaborately a SONG from a keyboard for advanced editing, why are you trying to transfer midi file of the track ? Wouldn't it be hassle free, if you record the song through a DAW, or some inline recorder, at your chosen formats !
Anupam
PSR-E453
 

Offline SeaGtGruff

Re: Exporting/Transferring a Recorded Song
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2017, 05:54:13 PM »
Extracting a Standard MIDI File from a PSR-E333 Backup File is possible, but it isn't really the best option. It takes a good bit of work and I don't recommend it to the average owner, because you'll need a working knowledge of

(1) hexadecimal and binary numbers,
(2) how to use a hex editor,
(3) how MIDI messages work, and
(4) the Standard MIDI File format.

Also, if you used a Style while recording your User Song, the actual Style parts don't get recorded, just the Style Number, the initial Style Section, and all of the chord changes and Style Section changes you made while playing.

There are two other options which are preferable, depending on what type of format you want the song to be in:

(1) To record your song as MIDI data, connect your keyboard to a computer via USB cable, make sure the MIDI options are set to output both the keyboard and the style playback, set up a MIDI track in a DAW, start recording on the MIDI track, use the keyboard's "InitSend" function to output the keyboard setup, then start the song playback on your keyboard. Then you can export the MIDI track to a Standard MIDI File.

(2) To record your song as audio data, connect your keyboard to a computer via audio cable, set up an audio track in a DAW, start recording on the audio track, then start the song playback on your keyboard. Then you can save the audio track to an audio file format-- preferably one that's lossless, such as WAV.

I simplified those descriptions, especially for audio recording, because if your song involves multiple tracks then you'd actually want to record each one to a separate audio track in your DAW; that way you (or your music producer) can work on each track separately before mixing everything down to a stereo track.
Michael Rideout
YPT-400, PSR-E433, PSR-E443