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PSR Tutorial Forum  |  Understanding PSR/Tyros Features  |  Styles/OTS (Moderators: MBedesem, mikf)  |  Topic: Midi2style programs 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Midi2style programs  (Read 2348 times)
Clamman
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« on: February 29, 2004, 11:53:21 PM »

Is there any place I can find a detailed instruction on how to use these programs?  I've been playing with a a few different ones and I've come up with some pretty awful sounding styles. :roll:

I was looking for details on what exactly the differences are between mainA, mainb fillaa fillbb are and the proper way or length to set them.  Any help would be greatly appreciated.  I haven't really got a grasp on how to use the styles on the keyboard yet.
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MBedesem
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« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2004, 12:52:10 AM »

Normally, the best place to find information is to look in the program's manual.

However, since you have the programs and are still lost, asking specific questions here or emailing the author of the specific program, Jorgen in the case of Midi2Style, me for StyleMaker, etc, is probably the best solution.

There are no requirements that Main A be different from Main B etc. Convention is that the arrangements go from simpler to complex (usually with the inclusion of pad and other support parts) as one goes from A to D, but this is up to you. The same is true of Intro A to C.

The only part that has a size limit is the Fill In. It cannot be greater than one measure. Others can be any length (but 2-4 measures is typical for Mains, up to 8 for Intros/ending).

Making styles is not easy. One way to learn how they should sound is to play them on your PSR and mute all but one part at a time while playing a CMaj7 chord. Chord1 & 2 are usually the most important. You can learn a lot from listening to how they sound versus a midi.

I hope that this is of some help.
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Michael P. Bedesem
mpb@vermontel.net
Tyros 5
Clamman
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« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2004, 02:20:34 AM »

Thank you for your response Michael it cleared up a couple of things already.  I guess my biggest problem is figuring out what a fill in actually is and what I'm looking for to do it with(eg. drums?).  Also my problem with the main a,b,c,d is am I correctin assuming that you are creating a part for the a-d buttons of the style control on the psr?  If so I seem to only end up with an A button lit and no other buttons selectable after saving the style. Is there something I am doing wrong with your program?
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MBedesem
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« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2004, 12:28:14 PM »

The best way to learn about fill ins is to listen to them. They are what you get if you depress a Main button while some other Main section is playing. Try holding the main button down to hear the fillin.

Main A is indeed the pattern that you get after depressing Main A.

I do not know why you are not getting several sections in StyleMaker. All you must do is depress the buttons for the sections you want to create. I suggest starting off with just a few until you have some practice in making styles. Main A, Intro A, Ending A and Filling A should be the minimum.

After selecting sections, go to the sequencer and listen to the music and decide what measures you want for Main A, Main B, Intro A etc and, by dragging or using a Marker View screen, reposition the beginning and ending markers (e.g. >MainA  and <MainA) to these points.

While listening, make a written note of the channels that you want to use for the 8 available PSR parts (Bass, Chord1, etc). Bass, Rhythm and Pad are easy; Chord 1 and 2 should be parts that have chords (guitar or piano tracks are typical), and the key of the music.

Save the midi by depressing Save in the sequencer and exit. In StyleMaker, depress AutoCasmSet and correct any of the channel assignments that it makes. If necessary, ConvertNotes to make the tracks correspond to Yamahas chord and tone rules and save the style.

If this basic procedure still gives you styles with only Main A, please send(mpb@sover.net) me a copy of the midi you are working with, your marker locations and the problem style and I will attempt to see what is going wrong.
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Michael P. Bedesem
mpb@vermontel.net
Tyros 5
Clamman
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« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2004, 10:24:14 PM »

Thank you for your help again Michael.  I actually made one that came out half way decent last night. Cheesy

The part I wrote about it not saving the other parts was a mistake on my part.  That was in a Syle Works demo I had tried and got the two programs confused. Come to find out it only saved one variation in the demo. :roll:

I like your program it works very good in combination with the Cakewalk Home Studio 2004 that I have.  Thanks again for the help it is greatly appreciated.
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MBedesem
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« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2004, 12:37:31 AM »

It is good news that you were able to have some success in making styles, regardless of which program was involved (but I am especially pleased that StyleMaker was useful).

Each of the programs has their strong points and special capabilities. It certainly is worthwhile to try them all. I personally use CasmEdit frequently and have had good experience with Midi2Style. OneManBand has also produced some excellent styles which the author has posted on the net. StyleWorks was the first, and has some very experienced and capable users which have rewarded us all with some very nice styles. It is too bad that there is not a cheaper version of this program available.

People often ask me for the secret of making great styles. My  answer is to listen to styles that you like by muting each part in turn. You may be surprised how simple some of these patterns are! Midi file tracks are often much too complicated and this makes it much more difficult to extract the essence of the sound to use as a style part.

The software programs are all only tools. Like brushes of the painter, they, by themself, are not the answer. YOU must know what you want and guide the tool to that goal. Listening and learning from styles that you like is the best way of learning the objective of the tool.

Simon Williams, one of the very best non-Yamaha style authors, does not use any program tools. He does all his styles on the PSR directly with real time recording. He repeatedly demonstrates that knowledge is the key element.

Michael
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Michael P. Bedesem
mpb@vermontel.net
Tyros 5
rphillipchuk
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« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2004, 02:07:44 AM »

Michael....

That was very well written.......I always enjoy reading your posts.....I guess Musicians are like " Poets " ....

RonP
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PSR Tutorial Forum  |  Understanding PSR/Tyros Features  |  Styles/OTS (Moderators: MBedesem, mikf)  |  Topic: Midi2style programs « previous next »
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