Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 ... 10
1
Tyros 5 (SFF2) / Re: Looking for style
« Last post by pethep on Today at 09:43:40 PM »
Thanks Ben for sharing
3
Korg PA4X is made in Italy but like just about every electronic device in your house there are very likely some components from China - nothing wrong with that at all. Often the reliability of musical instruments (especially electronic) falls back on the care of them (- road crew too!!!). I doubt there is much between the reliability of Genos and PA4X - two amazing instruments.

(One batch of Tyros 4s were faulty due to shipping conditions - so problems can be caused at any time)

Cheers

Pete :)
4
Forum Comments and Suggestions / Re: Where's Mark?
« Last post by Roger Brenizer on Today at 08:37:38 PM »
Here's a link to a topic, in which Mark posted on December 4, 2017, Wally.  :)

https://www.psrtutorial.com/forum/index.php/topic,41496.msg327442.html#msg327442
5
Yamaha Keyboards - General / Re: Interesting Comparison
« Last post by hans1966 on Today at 08:37:06 PM »
Hi Guys, for me both keyboards are wonderful, each one has its own charm, but the character that makes the demonstration is not professional, in my opinion the best comparisons of Korg and Yamaha are from BONNERS, below I share a real demonstration made by a professional. greetings Hans

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnduuDIIe4A

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xSlBk7ZMs7c
6
Genos - General / Re: Genos StyleFinder software (Windows Dot.Net)
« Last post by zionip on Today at 07:01:54 PM »
Hi Bert,

I tested your Genos StyleFinder software and found it very helpful in locating proper styles using different criteria - very convenient for Genos owners.  The user interface mimics the style selection screen of Genos, a good training tool for style selection.

Thanks,
Paul
7
Genos - General / Re: Empty Song B
« Last post by whataguy on Today at 05:33:47 PM »
What did he just say??????
8
Genos - General / Re: Genos in Canada
« Last post by whataguy on Today at 05:31:40 PM »
Unfortunately you're right T, but the Leafs are comin' here tomorrow night and I'm pumping laughing gas into their locker room. It's unfair of Yamaha to put out a tease and then not deliver. They should wait 'til they're ready to R & R before they put it out there. I can't even use all the stuff on my T5, why should I have to wait to not be able to use the stuff on the Genos. Any old person will tell you 2018 is a LONG way off, we don't think much passed tomorrow. Did you ever notice how much Ya-ma-ha resembles Ca-na-da?  Don in MI
9

My first exposure to electronics was when I was just 10 years old. I used to gather old radios from the sidewalks on trash day back then, take them home, strip down the chasis for the parts, vacuum tubes, sockets, capacitors, resistors, coils, transformers, etc..., then sort them out into small boxes. I eventually collected enough parts to construct my own short-wave transmitter and receiver and at age 12 I took the exam for my General Class Short Wave License and passed. Back then, it was a very difficult examination, and you had to know how to draw schematic diagrams of transmitters, receivers, power supplies, etc..., all from memory and electronic theory in order to pass. Additionally, you had to be able to send and receive Morse Code at 20 words per minute. Not so today. Today's Ham Radio license is much, much easier, and with a few nights of studying, most anyone could pass.

How things have changed,

Gary  8)
Your childhood pretty much mirrors mine. Weekend trips to the local town landfill with my Dad, I collected radio and TV chassis for parts salvage to build various projects. Was also fortunate that a couple of local electronic manufacturers also discarded some of their parts and test gear at the same landfill. Didn't build a shortwave transmitter, but one that broadcast on the regular AM band and I played the part of a 'radio DJ' for a month or so until complaints of radio interference (harmonics) in the neighborhood led the local police to my doorsteps. I even remember the output tube as being a 6BQ6 from a salvaged TV. Heathkit and Knight kits were the usual Christmas and birthday gifts. First transistor project at about age 13 was using a Raytheon CK722 germanium PNP that my Dad had gotten for me. Worked a few summers part time for a local radio/TV repairman. Never went on to get the ham license as the code part was my stumbling block.
At age 69 I still collect a few old tube record players and similar occasionally to do conversions to low power guitar amps.
10
Wow! I must really be old. I remember when all capacitors were made by Sprague Corporation, which was US based. Amazing!

Keep in mind that most electronic products are no longer bench tested before being released. The reason is that the failure rate of electronic devices is less than 1/10th of 1-percent. Bench testing before releasing would be cost prohibitive for most products, including keyboards and computers.

My first exposure to electronics was when I was just 10 years old. I used to gather old radios from the sidewalks on trash day back then, take them home, strip down the chasis for the parts, vacuum tubes, sockets, capacitors, resistors, coils, transformers, etc..., then sort them out into small boxes. I eventually collected enough parts to construct my own short-wave transmitter and receiver and at age 12 I took the exam for my General Class Short Wave License and passed. Back then, it was a very difficult examination, and you had to know how to draw schematic diagrams of transmitters, receivers, power supplies, etc..., all from memory and electronic theory in order to pass. Additionally, you had to be able to send and receive Morse Code at 20 words per minute. Not so today. Today's Ham Radio license is much, much easier, and with a few nights of studying, most anyone could pass.

How things have changed,

Gary  8)
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 ... 10