Author Topic: PSR-E353: can't transfer user-recorded songs to PC  (Read 3903 times)

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Offline SadPanda

PSR-E353: can't transfer user-recorded songs to PC
« on: May 19, 2016, 03:58:22 PM »
Hi,

I recently got myself a PSR-E353 and, as I'm making progress, I would like to be able to download the recordings which it allows to make. According to the owner's manual it should be possible. I followed the instructions, installed Musicsoft Downloader on my PC and successfully connected it to the keyboard. I see two directories there, "Flash Memory" and "System Drive". "Flash Memory" is always empty and "System Drive" contains PSR-E353.BUP file. I can successfully download that file (which, I believe, is the backup of keyboard's settings) to my PC, so there appears to be no fault with connection or cable.

The question is, where are the user-recorded songs supposed to show up and why can't I see them anywhere? Would appreciate any insights in getting this to work.

Thanks.
 

Offline SeaGtGruff

Re: PSR-E353: can't transfer user-recorded songs to PC
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2016, 04:37:08 PM »
The user songs are inside the BUP backup file. If you can email the file to me at SeaGtGruff@yahoo.com so I can check out its format, I should be able to extract the songs for you. Also, I'm putting together a document explaining how to extract user songs from the BUP backup files and USR user files of some PSR-E models, and I can add the PSR-E353 to the list once I've seen how its BUP backup file is formatted.
Michael Rideout
YPT-400, PSR-E433, PSR-E443
 

Offline SadPanda

Re: PSR-E353: can't transfer user-recorded songs to PC
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2016, 03:59:16 AM »
Thanks, SeaGtGruff, I emailed you the sample backup file - hope it helps.

It's a bit of a shame that one has to jump through hoops like this to get access to one's own recordings, I would expect that the keyboard would just show up as a USB-attached hard drive with files on, or something like this.

Cheers.
 

Offline SeaGtGruff

Re: PSR-E353: can't transfer user-recorded songs to PC
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2016, 06:58:05 AM »
Unfortunately, the PSR-E353 doesn't have a USB TO DEVICE port for plugging in a USB flash drive. The "Save SMF" function that converts a user song to SMF is on the FILE FUNCTION menu, which isn't included on the keyboard unless it has a USB TO DEVICE port.

I've just downloaded the file you sent me and will look at it. I should warn you that extracting the song directly as I'll be doing doesn't include the actual style parts you used (if any), just the chord changes and other style-related data that the keyboard needs to play back the accompaniment track, so the MIDI file I extract will not play correctly in a DAW, only on your keyboard-- which I assume is how you want to play it back, anyway, so hopefully that won't be a problem.
Michael Rideout
YPT-400, PSR-E433, PSR-E443
 

Offline SadPanda

Re: PSR-E353: can't transfer user-recorded songs to PC
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2016, 12:59:02 AM »
Thanks for your efforts! In the meantime I read about it some more and found an alternative solution which mostly does what I need, without the need of fiddling with the backup file. It turns out that when connected to a PC via USB the keyboard presents itself as a standard MIDI source, and there are plenty of free programs which can record that. I'm mostly using Linux, so I successfully used Rosegarden to record MIDI from the keyboard and then was able to synthesize an acceptable-quality WAV from it using Timidity. Recording this way will probably not preserve custom styles and accompaniment tracks from the keyboard, but at this point it's too early for me to worry about it  :).
 

Offline SeaGtGruff

Re: PSR-E353: can't transfer user-recorded songs to PC
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2016, 10:31:49 PM »
Yes, and recording with a DAW on your computer is better than extracting the MIDI data for the User Song, especially in your case where you're using a PSR-E353, because with a DAW you won't be limited to recording just two tracks per song. Be aware that when you use a DAW you'll need to go into your keyboard's Function menu and set the "StyleOut" function to "On" if you want to record your auto accompaniment performance.

I'm emailing you the User Song that I've extracted from the Backup file you sent me. This is really sort of a test, so if there are any problems with it, let me know and I'll modify it. Based on what I saw in the Backup file, it looked like this was User Song 5, correct? And it looks like there was no auto accompaniment recorded, just Track 1? I left the auto accompaniment track in, even though it's essentially blank, but I can remove it if there was no auto accompaniment recorded and if the extra blank track causes a problem.

In particular, please check whether the Tempo is correct, as I had to add a header section ("MThd") and arbitrarily used a PPQN setting of 480, whereas it might have needed to be 384. If the Tempo seems a bit off, I'll change the PPQN to 384 so you can try it again.

By the way, are you saying that you were able to connect the PSR-E353 to a computer running Linux and it worked? If so, that's great news, because I was led to believe by someone on another site that Yamaha keyboards can't interface with Linus computers since they reputedly aren't "class compliant" and Yamaha doesn't make a USB-MIDI driver for Linux. What version of Linux are you using? I have Ubuntu installed on a virtual machine on my Windows 10 computer, but I've never tried to use any of my Yamaha keyboards with it.
Michael Rideout
YPT-400, PSR-E433, PSR-E443
 

Offline Cazaimex

Re: PSR-E353: can't transfer user-recorded songs to PC
« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2017, 05:07:04 AM »
Yes, and recording with a DAW on your computer is better than extracting the MIDI data for the User Song, especially in your case where you're using a PSR-E353, because with a DAW you won't be limited to recording just two tracks per song. Be aware that when you use a DAW you'll need to go into your keyboard's Function menu and set the "StyleOut" function to "On" if you want to record your auto accompaniment performance.

I'm emailing you the User Song that I've extracted from the Backup file you sent me. This is really sort of a test, so if there are any problems with it, let me know and I'll modify it. Based on what I saw in the Backup file, it looked like this was User Song 5, correct? And it looks like there was no auto accompaniment recorded, just Track 1? I left the auto accompaniment track in, even though it's essentially blank, but I can remove it if there was no auto accompaniment recorded and if the extra blank track causes a problem.

In particular, please check whether the Tempo is correct, as I had to add a header section ("MThd") and arbitrarily used a PPQN setting of 480, whereas it might have needed to be 384. If the Tempo seems a bit off, I'll change the PPQN to 384 so you can try it again.

By the way, are you saying that you were able to connect the PSR-E353 to a computer running Linux and it worked? If so, that's great news, because I was led to believe by someone on another site that Yamaha keyboards can't interface with Linus computers since they reputedly aren't "class compliant" and Yamaha doesn't make a USB-MIDI driver for Linux. What version of Linux are you using? I have Ubuntu installed on a virtual machine on my Windows 10 computer, but I've never tried to use any of my Yamaha keyboards with it.

Hello sir

My apologies for replying to this old thread. A friend of the family recently bought herself this model keyboard (second hand) with the hopes of transferring the files she plays and records to PC and creating her own music CD. I tried hard to it sorted (downloading and installing music downloader on her Windows 10 running PC), but to no avail. After Googling a bit I found this thread, and was very dismayed  :( So there's basically no way to get her songs onto the PC apart from the USR file being fiddled with?
 

Offline SeaGtGruff

Re: PSR-E353: can't transfer user-recorded songs to PC
« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2017, 10:40:19 AM »
That depends on what the end goal is-- to have the songs on the PC in MIDI form, or in audio form (such as MP3).

When a User Song is recorded on one of the PSR-E models, the voice selections, notes, and style-related data are saved as MIDI data, but not as a complete MIDI file. Also, the song seems to be recorded using a low PPQN value of 128, and the actual notes and percussion beats of the style aren't recorded, just the style chord changes and section changes. This allows each song to take up less memory, such that more/longer songs can fit into the memory space, which is a good thing.

On newer PSR-E4xx models-- specifically, the PSR-E433, PSR-E443, and PSR-E453-- there is an onboard "Save SMF" function which takes the internal MIDI data of a User Song and uses it to create a complete MIDI file or SMF ("Standard MIDI File"). The expanded MIDI song file is written to a USB flash drive, hence this "Save SMF" function appears only on models equipped with a "USB To Device" port for inserting a USB flash drive. The PSR-E3xx models don't have that port, nor did the earlier PSR-E4xx models (PSR-E403, PSR-E413, and PSR-E423), hence they don't have an onboard function for saving a User Song as a complete MIDI song file.

However, that doesn't mean there's no way to transfer a User Song to a computer. Most people will want to record a song in audio form-- such as an MP3 file-- so it can be easily shared with friends and family. A MIDI file can also be shared, but it could sound much different when played back on different computers depending on the MIDI soft synth used, and the only way it will sound just like it did on the keyboard would be to play it back on a keyboard of the same model. So let's look at saving to an audio file first, since that's going to be the more common goal.

The newest models-- PSR-E453 and PSR-E363-- have built-in USB audio capabilities, so you can record the keyboard's audio output by connecting a USB 2 cable from the keyboard's "USB To Host" port to a USB port on a computer. Then you can use a DAW or other audio-recording software to record the keyboard's audio output on the computer.

The prior models don't have USB audio, so you'll need to buy either a USB audio interface, or just an audio cable.

If you decide to buy a USB audio interface-- which will usually give you a better/cleaner signal-- you don't need an expensive one. I use a simple and inexpensive Behringer UCA-222 audio interface, which requires buying a special cable that has a 1/4" TRS ("tip-ring-sleeve" or stereo) plug on one end and separate Left/Right RCA plugs on the other end, since the UCA-222 has separate Left/Right RCA audio inputs. But depending on your needs, you might prefer to get an audio interface that includes a variety of inputs, such as XLR inputs for plugging in microphones, or MIDI ports for connecting to MIDI devices that don't have built-in USB-MIDI.

The least expensive solution is to buy an audio cable to go from the "PHONES/OUTPUT" jack on the keyboard to the "LINE IN" jack on a computer-- or, if the computer doesn't have a "LINE IN" jack, you can also use the "MIC IN" jack, although most jacks for a microphone will be mono rather than stereo. The keyboard's "PHONES/OUTPUT" jack takes a 1/4" TRS plug, whereas a computer's audio jacks take a 1/8" plug, so you'll either need to buy a special audio cable that has a 1/4" TRS plug on one end and a 1/8" TRS plug on the other end, or just buy an audio cable with 1/8" TRS plugs (readily available in many stores) and buy a 1/8"-female-TRS-to-1/4"-male-TRS adapter (possibly available in some stores in an "audio connection kit").

Once the keyboard is connected to the computer via USB-audio or regular audio, you can use a DAW or other audio-recording software to record the keyboard's audio output. If you've already recorded the song on the keyboard, all you need to do is go into the keyboard's Function menu, turn on the "Song Out" function, turn on the recording function in the DAW, and play back the User Song while recording. Or you can just record one or more audio tracks while you're playing the keyboard, instead of recording a User Song on the keyboard first.

If you'd rather record the keyboard's MIDI output, that's also possible, but I'll discuss that in a separate post.
Michael Rideout
YPT-400, PSR-E433, PSR-E443