Author Topic: Performing  (Read 1781 times)

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Offline adrianed

Performing
« on: January 04, 2016, 04:49:57 PM »
Hi Folks,

How long should a player play continuously at each sitting IE without a break.

Just wondering how long the audience should be expected to listen without a break

I have been asked to play for 30 mins continuous, I just thought that is too long for the listeners ( and a bit long for myself )

Adrian
« Last Edit: January 04, 2016, 04:53:26 PM by adrianed »
 

Offline Roger Brenizer

Re: Performing
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2016, 07:00:45 PM »
Hi Adrian,

I don't play professionally anymore.  There are many here who are more qualified to answer your question from a current day aspect; however, I will tell you how it once was for me when I played the accordion professionally.

It somewhat depends on the type of audience and the general age of the people in the audience.  I can tell you that I have performed in 20 minute segments to in excess of an hour in the past.  I don't tire of playing, easily, so playing for an extended length of time is not a chore for me.  An hour or two goes by very quickly for me.

If you feel 30 minutes is too long for you, then simply advise the person hiring you that you would like to play for a shorter amount time and play more than one segment in your performance.

I'm sure Don Mason and Gary Diamond will give you some very good advice in this regard.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2016, 10:28:10 AM by Roger Brenizer »
"Music Is My Life"
My best regards,
Roger

(The older I get...the better I used to be...LOL!!!)
Rogerís PSR Performer Page
 

Online Fred Smith

Re: Performing
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2016, 08:03:06 PM »
Hi Folks,

How long should a player play continuously at each sitting IE without a break.

Just wondering how long the audience should be expected to listen without a break

I have been asked to play for 30 mins continuous, I just thought that is too long for the listeners ( and a bit long for myself )

Adrian

I think you should perform for at least 45 minutes out of each hour. That's what they are paying for -- the performance, not silence or background music. I don't think a requested 30 minute performance is asking too much; if anything, it's asking too little.

The easy way to make the decision is to remember the customer is always right.

Fred
Fred Smith,
Saskatoon, SK
Sun Lakes, AZ
Tyros 4, Bose L1, Finale 2011
Check out my Registration Lessons
 

Offline adrianed

Re: Performing
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2016, 08:10:52 PM »
Thankyou for that advice Roger,

Any information I can get will help me to work to a plan

I often sit for two hours practising but its not all quality playing, some of the time is trying new things etc and a cup of tea or two

Adrian
 

Offline adrianed

Re: Performing
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2016, 08:14:20 PM »
Hi Fred,

Point taken about pleasing the customer, This our grand daughter's wedding so I am also a guest and playing free.

Adrian
 

Offline DonM

Re: Performing
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2016, 08:54:57 PM »
Pros are expected to play 45 minutes and take a 15 minute break each hour, as a rule.
I've been at the same place so long that I can pretty much set my own rules.  I've played the entire four hours without breaking before, but I don't do that any more, since I'm getting old.  I make myself take a break each hour, but it's seldom more than 5-10 minutes.
I read the audience and work accordingly.  If the place is full and we need to turn tables over, I will take more breaks.  And I must admit timing is important as far as getting tips.  If a table leaves when you are on break, it's easy for them to "forget" you.
I make it a point to visit each table at some point during their meal and talk with them, ask them if they are having a good time, give them a chance to make requests, etc.  The waiters tell me if they are celebrating a birthday or anniversary so I can acknowledge that on the mic and play a special song for them.
It's a BUSINESS, and you have to treat it that way.
Now, if you are a guest and not getting paid, all that goes out the window.  Play as long as you are comfortable then join the party!  Take as long a break as you want.  I can't even remember the last time I played for free, other than maybe a gathering of relatives and friends at our house.  To me it's like the caterer supplying all the food for free.  Ain't gonna happen! 
Again, if you are an amateur and doing someone a favor, there are no rules.
DonM
 

Offline adrianed

Re: Performing
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2016, 10:22:55 PM »
Interesting reading your message Donm,

I should have said earlier that I am not likely to become professional, I am only just getting a grip on playing and I am close to 80.  ( Perhaps its time to update my photo on the site )

I case you think I am a softy though, I spent most of my life running my own business of commercial flooring as well as Running a Camera shop all at the same time and also going through all the exams of Radio an TV engineering.

Must say Don when I am out for a meal and show I hate the band folk coming around my table so I wont be doing that.

Regards,

Adrian   
« Last Edit: January 04, 2016, 10:25:56 PM by adrianed »
 

Offline DonM

Re: Performing
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2016, 11:23:30 PM »
Adrian, I'm not far behind you in age.  I'm pretty careful about how I approach the customers.  In the first place, the ones that are in my room know there is live music, and there are other dining rooms that are quieter.
I'll stroll by and say hello while I'm passing and they generally indicate by their action or response if they want to visit.  And we have a lot of regulars.  Some want their privacy for sure.
You do have to be careful! 
Hey as long as you enjoy what you are doing, go for it.  I didn't mean to be critical at all and sorry if it came off that way. 
Have a great 2016!
DonM
 

Offline jtrue

Re: Performing
« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2016, 07:07:34 AM »
For a number of years I was a union musician and many venues where I played were union shops like hotels, banquet halls and country clubs where service staff were also unionized. The work rule for union musicians was "40 on, 20 off" and was pretty closely observed in those venues. However, at other locations, it was more like 45 to 50 on and 10 to 15 off. I think DonM has set forth the common standards very well.

Regarding speaking to audience members while on break, you need to remember that, whether you feel like it or not, you are a minor celebrity while on the job and most audience members like to be recognized and bask in your reflected glory. Remembering names and personal details of customers is one of the things that keeps bringing them back. Most audience members are not musically sophisticated and may not fully appreciate what you're doing on the stand but everyone likes attention, especially if it comes from someone who is somewhat special.

  j.
It don't mean a thing...